Depression Among Elderly Men Is Rampant

Although women are diagnosed with depression about twice as often as men, four times as many men as women commit suicide. Part of the depression-vs-suicide discrpancy is due to the fact that men and women have different symptoms and too many mental health professionals don’t recognize men’s. In this guest post, Alena Shelly explains some of the factors that lead to depressnion in a particularly affected group: older men.

You may not be elderly or even middle aged (yet) but there are probably men in your life who are in that age category. Were you aware the group most at risk for suicide is older, white men? The suicide rate in the 80 to 84 age group is actually twice that of the general population. Many older men are in poor health and have become dependent on others for help. They don’t like this because they are not accustomed to being “needy.” When a man perceives himself as strong, independent and the one who took care of others it is hard to lose one’s autonomy. [Read more...]

Learning the Facts About Breast Cancer and Debunking the Myths

The phrase “breast cancer” can be plenty scary–to the person who receives the diagnosis as well as to the family. But thanks to incredibly awareness campaigns and advances in medical technology, quite often, breast cancer is treatable.  In this guest post, Jamie Pratt, sheds some much needed light on this disease.

For many of us, hearing the words breast cancer conjures up a dismal picture. Any form of cancer is a frightening thought, and breast cancer affects not only the stricken individual, but loved ones as well. Breast cancer awareness is designed to educate everyone, just as this unforgiving disease touches all walks of life. This awareness may be in the form of promotional items, educational websites and pamphlets, or simply word of mouth. Having access to the necessary tools, such as forums or cancer risk assessments, can make a difference. Annual mammograms, primarily for women past the age of 45, is essential in helping to detect breast cancer early on.

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Two Important Points about the Aurora Shooting

The horrific shooting in Colorado has been so extensively analyzed that there’s almost nothing left to say. Almost. There are two issues that should be getting more attention.

First, we need to acknowledge that three of the victims were men who used their own bodies to protect their girlfriends. We’re going to hear a lot over the next months and years about how males are violent, but it’s important that we not forget that men are also heroic (far more often than they’re violent). Without giving a second thought to their own safety, Jon Blunk, Matt McQuinn and Alex Teves gave their lives so the women they loved could live.

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Women with skin cancer do better than men — and it’s not estrogen

A new study found that men with skin cancer are 30% more likely to die or have a recurrence than women. Researchers thought that estrogen might have a protective effect. But the reasons are more complicated. You should check out my article on the  Talking About Men’s Health blog, here.

 

 

Sometimes it’s better NOT to talk about your weight

Making comments like “I’m fat” predicts higher levels of depression and lower body satisfaction, a new study finds

Washington, DC (March 22, 2012)- Commenting that you think you are fat may be hazardous to your mental health. Engaging in “fat talk”—the ritualistic conversations about one’s own or others’ bodies—predicts lower satisfaction with one’s body and higher levels of depression, finds a new study recently published online in the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research.

“These results suggest that expressing weight-related concerns, which is common especially among women, has negative effects,” said the study’s lead author, Analisa Arroyo, a Ph.D. student in communication at the University of Arizona, Tucson. “We found that fat talk predicts changes in depression, body satisfaction, and perceived pressure to be thin across time.”

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The high costs of raising an autistic child

Did you know that it may cost $3.2 million to care for an autistic child over his or her lifetime?

As if that wasn’t bad enough, families with autistic children earn almost $18,000 less per year than parents of normally developing kids, according to a new report out from the Center for Autism Research at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Interestingly, dads of autistic children were just as likely to work and earned just as much as dads of kids without disabilities. But moms were a different story. Compared with mothers of non-autistic children, moms with autistic children were less likely to be employed, worked fewer hours per week, and brought home less a lot less.

Given that $3.2 million pricetag, it’s no wonder that at least one parent had to work full time. Someone’s got to provide health insurance for the family and have enough left over to pick up the additional disability-related costs.

I’d love to look into this more. If you have an autistic child, please let me know if you’d be up for being interviewed.