Depression Among Elderly Men Is Rampant

Although women are diagnosed with depression about twice as often as men, four times as many men as women commit suicide. Part of the depression-vs-suicide discrpancy is due to the fact that men and women have different symptoms and too many mental health professionals don’t recognize men’s. In this guest post, Alena Shelly explains some of the factors that lead to depressnion in a particularly affected group: older men.

You may not be elderly or even middle aged (yet) but there are probably men in your life who are in that age category. Were you aware the group most at risk for suicide is older, white men? The suicide rate in the 80 to 84 age group is actually twice that of the general population. Many older men are in poor health and have become dependent on others for help. They don’t like this because they are not accustomed to being “needy.” When a man perceives himself as strong, independent and the one who took care of others it is hard to lose one’s autonomy. [Read more...]

Recognizing Red Flags and Learning to Intervene Early Are Key To Helping Children Who Stutter

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Stuttering Foundation Team Up to Spread the Word 

(Rockville, MD and Memphis, TN–May 7, 2012) The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), www.asha.org, and the Stuttering Foundation, www.StutteringHelp.org, are working together during National Stuttering Awareness Week (May 7–13) to raise awareness with parents and other caregivers about the warning signs of stuttering and the need for early intervention for a child who stutters.

Often, children stutter when learning to talk, typically between 2 and 5 years old. During this age, as a child is in the midst of a major leap in language skills, it is natural that a child may have difficulty with fluency because speech and language, thinking, and motor skills are still developing. However, most children stop stuttering after a short period of time.

[Read more...]

Snoring kids have more behavior problems

Does your child snore, breathe through her mouth, or seem to step breathing for a few seconds at a time? If so, there’s a pretty good chance that you’re going to be seeing some behavioral or emotional problems (like ADD, ADHD, and anxiety) pretty soon.

In the largest study of its kind, doctors tracked 13,000 kids from infancy through age seven. 45 percent of the kids had no breathing problems. The other 55 percent did, including 8 percent who were in the “worst case” group (meaning their breathing issues peaked between ages 2 and 3 and then persisted.

Of the kids who had some kind of breathing problems, about 8 percent developed behavioral problems. But for the ones who did have some breathing issues, 13.5 percent had behavior problems. The “worst case” kids had a whopping 72 percent chance of developing behavioral and/or emotional symptoms by age seven.

The study was published in the journal Pediatrics. An article about the study is here:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/06/us-snoring-tied-kids-idUSTRE8251KG20120306