My Dad, the Neighborhood, and Sports: The Value of a Good Game

My family grew up in Pepperell, Massachusetts and what made it so amazing was that my father was one of ten brothers (yes, 10!). Because of family history there was a 99% chance that you would become a carpenter (or did some kind of activity in construction).

Everyone in the family held these type of professions which created a really unique upbringing because my family and extended family essentially built the neighborhoods all around where we lived. Everyone knew one another and all us kids were always roaming the streets going from house to house.

One of the most popular activities we kids would play (often joined by our dads) was street hockey since so many of us were still pretty bad at ice skating at that time.

In Mass you’ve basically got your football and you’ve got your hockey.

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Preventing Sports-Related Head Injuries

According to the University of Rochester Medical Center, 30 million children and teens participate in some type of organized sport or recreational activity, and each year there are more than 3.5 million injuries from sports participation. Almost a third of childhood injuries are sports-related, with sprains, strains, and traumatic brain injuries (most commonly called concussions) being the most common. In September 2013, CBS News reported that sports-related head injuries had increased by more than 90 percent since 2001.
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Pregnant Athletes + Hilarious Lessons in Parenting


Brandi Dion and Steven Dion, coauthors of The Pregnant Athlete.
Topic:
How to stay in your best shape ever before, during, and after pregnancy.
Issues: How to gauge your limits as your pregnancy progresses; eating well to support pregnancy and fuel your workouts; common myths and misconceptions about pregnancy; finding the best workout for you.


Johanna Stein, author of How Not to Calm a Baby on a Plane.
Topic:
Hilarious, real-life lessons in parenting.
Issues: Going to war against the color pink; calming your child on a plane with a barfbag puppet–that someone else had used; your first emergency room visit; the most embarrassing and satisfying moments of parenthood; why to never play a practical joke in a hospital delivery room.

Procter & Gamble is Dissing Dads. Again. Seriously?

Dear Mr. Dad: About a year and a half ago, you wrote a column about Procter & Gamble’s “Thank You, Mom” campaign that ran during the summer Olympics. You correctly pointed out that P&G was completely ignoring dads and how important they are. I thought P&G had gotten the message, but in the run-up to this year’s winter Olympics, they’re running the very same campaign. What’s their problem?

A: You’re absolutely right. P&G’s campaign during the London Games (which, by the way, was just a tweak of the “Proud Sponsor of Moms” campaign they ran four years earlier, during the Beijing Games) is back. This time, it’s worse. Here’s why:

First, they’ve made the spots more tear-jerking than ever. Each one is a masterpiece. But each one also reinforces the message that mothers are the only parents who care about their children and encourage them to achieve great things.

Second, they seem to be going out of their way to slap dads in the face. Yes, moms deserve a ton of gratitude and thanks. But so do dads. How ‘bout a second campaign that thanks fathers? Or just “Thank you Mom and Dad”? Nope. P&G is doing everything they can to convince consumers that dads don’t exist.
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Stop the Invisible Injury–Parents and Coaches Share the Responsibility, Part 2

This is Part 2 of our 2-part series. In Part 1, we talked about the prevalence of concussions, the signs and symptoms, and the important role parents and coaches play in preventing and treating them.

 

Based on a foundation of competition and physical perseverance, it’s hard to withstand the “win at all costs” pressure that has come to exist in athletics.  CoachUp football coach and former Patriots offensive tackle, Max Lane, recognizes that pressure but also understands the life-long impact this injury can have on an athlete.  “Everybody wants to win.  Coaches have to let the players know that at the beginning of the season that the coach is fostering an atmosphere of safety first, even when that means safety over winning.  The coach has to communicate to the players that it’s okay for them to speak up if they’ve been hit in the head.” [Read more...]

Smart Parenting in a Toxic Sports Environment

[amazon asin=0762786655&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Luis Fernando Llosa, co-author of Beyond Winning.
Topic:
Smart parenting in a toxic sports environment
Issues: Why kids shouldn’t do organized sports until about age 11; the importance of not trying to live your sports fantasies through your children; avoiding bullying, trash talk, and elitism; picking sports based on your child’s developmental stage; suggestions for how to revamp the youth sports industry.