Monitoring Language Development + Dangers of Casual Sex + Raising Bookworms

[amazon asin=0307952282&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Kenn Apel, coauthor of Beyond Baby Talk.
Topic: Understanding children’s language and literacy development.
Issues: How to evaluate and monitor your child’s spoken language development; enhancing your child’s literacy skills to improve spelling, reading, and writing; recognizing signs of literacy and language problems and know when to get professional help.

[amazon asin=0802450601&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Joe S. McIlhaney Jr., coauthor of Hooked.
Topic: New science on how casual sex is affecting our children.
Issues: Chemicals released in the brain during sex can become addictive; the human brain isn’t fully developed until mid-twenties—until then, it’s harder to make wise relationship decisions; how to steer young people away from making life-changing mistakes.


[amazon asin=098158330X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Emma Walton Hamilton, coauthor of Raising Bookworms,
Topic: Getting kids reading for pleasure and empowerment.
Issues: Why it’s important for kids to grow up with the skills and appetite for reading; studies show that elective reading has declined dramatically over the past 50 years, but in over to participate in today’s and tomorrow’s workplace, young people will need powerful literacy skills to succeed; how to instill a love of reading in children from infants through teens.

Me and You Are on the Same Page

Dear Mr. Dad: When I was in elementary school, there was a much greater emphasis on English grammar and usage. I remember diagramming sentences and memorizing spelling rules. Does anyone do that anymore? My third grader—who goes to a very expensive private school—comes home with notes from his teacher (or school newsletters) that frequently contain grammar and spelling mistakes. I’m worried that our kids are going to come out of school completely illiterate. Is there any hope?

A: Depends on what you mean by hope. The English language is a living, growing thing—just think of all the new words and ways of using them that have crept into our dictionaries over the past few years: Green and friend are now verbs (as in “greening your home” and “I’m going to friend you”). And five years ago, had you ever heard of webinar, ecotourism, emoticon, netbook, or notspot? We’re never going to be able to stop our language from evolving—and I think that’s a good thing. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t make an attempt to at least use it properly. People (and by “people” I mean “plenty of native English speakers”) make dozens of usage errors. Some are kind of entertaining, but others can actually distort what’s being said. Here are a few of the ones that drive me batty.
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