Fool Proof Father-Son Experiences in 2014

Now that Father’s Day has passed and your family has showered you with the appreciation every dad deserves, it’s time to start planning the next father-son outing to return the favor. Planning unique activities with your kid is about much more than just finding fun things to do. It’s a chance to share valuable bonding experiences and and even pass down skills they can use in the future.

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Adventures with Asperger’s and High Explosives

[amazon asin=0307884848&template=thumbleft&chan=default]John Elder Robison, author of Raising Cubby.
Topic:
A father and son’s adventure with Asperger’s, trains, tractors, and high explosives.
Issues:How an unapologetically eccentric dad raised his equally eccentric son. A tender, suspenseful, and laugh-out-loud funny story of a father and son who grow up together.

An Unconventional Dad Raising an Eccentric Son + Daring Girls + Longing and Belonging

[amazon asin=0307884848&template=thumbleft&chan=default]John Elder Robison, author of Raising Cubby.
Topic:
A father and son’s adventure with Asperger’s, trains, tractors, and high explosives.
Issues:How an unapologetically eccentric dad raised his equally eccentric son. A tender, suspenseful, and laugh-out-loud funny story of a father and son who grow up together.


[amazon asin=0062208969&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Andrea Buchanan, author of The Double Daring Book for Girls.
Topic: A guide to everything a girl needs to know
Issue: Camping to schoolyard games, great women in history, shooting pool; how to throw and catch; making sand castles, the Greek alphabet, how to spin a hula hoop, and much more


[amazon asin=0520258444&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Allison Pugh, author of Longing and Belonging.
Topic: Parents, children, and consumer culture
Issues: How parents decrease their own power in the home by putting their children’s needs first; how to handle kids’ consumer desires in a down economy; what really drives consumer desires.

Lessons To Teach Your Son

When asking myself the lessons a father must teach their son, I had to break this down into two groups.  There are both primary lessons and indirect or secondary lessons that fathers must teach their children. The primary lessons I feel are the most important and the secondary ones are what fathers can teach children [...]

Girls, Girls Everywhere and Not a Boy in Sight

Dear Mr. Dad: My wife and I have twin daughters, and are now expecting our third child–another daughter. I feel terrible about thinking this way, but when we found out the new arrival was going to be another girl, I was disappointed. It’s as though having a third daughter reduces my value as a man (I’m quite sure my in-laws, who were hoping for a boy this time ’round too, feel exactly the same way). This probably makes me sound like a terrible person, but I was really hoping for a jock. Is there anything I can do to move past this internal struggle?

A: The first thing you need to do is stop torturing yourself. There is absolutely no scientific evidence that shows that fathers of girls are any less masculine than fathers of boys (and I say that as a Marine Corps veteran with three daughters). Although most parents wouldn’t admit it in public, there’s a ton of research that shows that a majority of dads—and moms—do have a preference. And that preference is usually for a boy. Men often hope for boys because they aren’t quite sure what to do with girls. And women often hope for boys because they want their husband to be happy. After the first child, though, most parents say they want the next one to be the other sex. So you’re not alone.

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Could Child Abuse Cause Cancer?

There’s no question that for many children, being abused increases their risk of anxiety, depression, academic and behavioral problems, and other mental health issues. But a researcher at Purdue University (in Indiana) just found an unexpected link between child abuse and cancer. Kenneth Ferraro, a sociologist at Purdue’s Center on Aging and the Life Course, and his colleagues found that frequent abuse by a parent increased a child’s risk of developing cancer as an adult.
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