Lawrence Hall of Science

SavedPicture-201422165453.jpg

A fantastic science museum in Berkeley. Always interesting–and educational–exhibits.

Getting Kids Thinking and Exploring

One of our favorite brands for educational-yet-still-truly-fun toys is Educational Insights. As parents, we marvel at how creative and well-thought-out EI’s products are—and we enjoy all the “ah-ha” and teachable moments they elicit. But we also love how engaged they keep the kids, and how much fun the youngsters are having when they’re playing (and [...]

Can Sex Make You Smarter?

We all know the benefits of sex: it feels good, it’s a great way to relieve stress, and the hormones it release can act as an antidepressant. Other studies have found that lack of sex increases stress, which, in turn, may inhibit growth of new brain cells.

But Dr. Jens Forster and a team of researchers at the University of Amsterdam put two and two together and found that sexually aroused people actually do better on tests of critical thinking than those who aren’t aroused. In other words, they say, sex may make us smarter.

(One has to wonder, though, why you’d stop having sex to take a critical thinking test in the first place–and could it be that the incentive to get back in the sack could make you think a little more clearly?)

[Read more...]

The Finnish Line: Could Americans Learn From the Finnish Education System?

Seems like every few months there’s a story about how bad American students do in math, science, and reading than many other countries. Usually, we’re compared with China and South Korea and a few other Asian countries where Tiger parenting rules supreme. (South Korea, by the way, has the highest student suicide rate of any country in the world. I think I’d opt for a live child with lower grades than a dead straight-A student.) But what we don’t hear much about is Finland, which does remarkably well on these tests and has happier, less-depressed (and less suicidal) children. In this guest post from Jason Evan, we’ll find out what Finland is doing that we might be able to learn from.

Here in the States, we like to think of ourselves as the best and the brightest. For sure, there is a lot of brainpower coming out of America (we have Mark Zuckerberg, after all), yet in 2010 the scores from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) exams were released and the U.S. was found to be about middling in reading, science and math (14th, 17th and 25th, respectively). Sure, we have some of our most ambitious and able resident pursuing programs such as LL.M taxation eventually, but what about those formative early years?

[Read more...]

%d bloggers like this: