Don’t Be the Parent You Hate

Deborah Gilboa, author of Get the Behavior You Want Without Being the Parent You Hate.
Topic:
A guild to what works and what doesn’t–and why not.
Issues: The three essential Rs of parenting: respect, responsibility, and responsibility; how to avoid being the parent you hate; learning to say No and not regretting it later; rights vs. privileges; the importance of consistency in parenting.

Why Helicopter Parents are Bad + New Approaches to Challenging Kids

www.amazon.co.ukGuest: 1: Vicki Hoefle, author of Duct Tape Parenting.
Topic: A less-is-more approach to raising respectful, responsible, resilient kids.
Issues: Why helicopter mothers and fathers are bad for kids; why it’s important for moms and dads to sit on their hands and stay on the sidelines so that children can step up, solve their own problems, and develop life-long confidence.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 2: Barbara Probst, author of When the Labels Don’t Fit/
Topic: A new approach to raising a challenging child.
Issues: Discovering your child’s essential nature and temperament; respecting your child’s inner world; changing the way you think, talk, and respond; knowing when and how to help; taking care of yourself.

Teaching Values + Adventures in Homeschooling

www.amazon.co.ukGuest 1: Mary O’Dohohue, author of When You Say ‘Thank You,’ Mean It.
Topic: 12 lessons for instilling lifelong values in your children.
Issues: A 12-month program (that’s easy to implement and actually works) for teaching values: gratitude, self-respect, respect for others, integrity, compassion, forgiveness, a sense of joy, commitment, lifelong learning, inner strength, spirituality, and a sense of purpose.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 2: Quinn Cummings, author of The Year of Learning Dangerously.
Topic: Adventures in homeschooling.
Issues: Making the decision to enter the unfamiliar water of homeschooling; the highlights and pitfalls of taking your children’s education into your own hands; what do to—and what not to do along the way.

Teaching Values + The Homeschooling Adventure + Bullies and Asperger’s + Bullyproof Your Child

www.amazon.co.ukGuest 1: Mary O’Dohohue, author of When You Say ‘Thank You,’ Mean It.
Topic: 12 lessons for instilling lifelong values in your children.
Issues: A 12-month program (that’s easy to implement and actually works) for teaching values: gratitude, self-respect, respect for others, integrity, compassion, forgiveness, a sense of joy, commitment, lifelong learning, inner strength, spirituality, and a sense of purpose.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 2: Quinn Cummings, author of The Year of Learning Dangerously.
Topic: Adventures in homeschooling.
Issues: Making the decision to enter the unfamiliar water of homeschooling; the highlights and pitfalls of taking your children’s education into your own hands; what do to—and what not to do along the way.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 3: Nick Dubin, author of Asperger’s Syndrome and Bullying.
Topic: Strategies and solutions for kids with Asperger’s and their parents.
Issues: Almost all children with Asperger’s are victimized by bullies between the ages of 11 and 19; the traits that make children with Asperger’s particularly susceptible to bullying; teaching children how to tell the difference between bullying and true friendship.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 4: Joel Haber, author of Bullyproof Your Child for Life.
Topic: Protecting children from teasing, taunting, and bullying for good.
Issues: How our culture glorifies bullies and holds abusive people (like Simon Cowell on American Idol) up as role models; specific questions, comebacks, and action steps to help any child build resilience and confidence, and thrive in school, camp, sports, and beyond.

Fighting in front of the Kids

My wife and I-like most couples-have our share of disagreements on how to parent. One of the things we’ve been disagreeing on lately is whether or not it’s okay to fight in front of the kids. I think it will teach our children how to compromise. My wife thinks it will scar them for life. What do you think?

Parenting approaches are the source of just about as many marital spats as money and division of labor. Ideally, you should avoid having huge fights in front of your children. Kids are scared and confused when their parents yell at each other, and researchers have found that the angrier the parents, the more distressed the children.
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Who’s Your Daddy?

Dear Mr. Dad: My husband is 42 but often hangs out with our 13-year-old son and his friends, acting like a kid himself. Am I wrong to want my husband to act his age instead of trying to be our boy’s buddy?

A: There’s nothing wrong with expecting your husband to be a good role model–a mature, responsible, and trustworthy individual your son can look up to, respect, and admire.

But the fact that your husband spends time with your son and his friends doesn’t necessarily mean he’s not good role model material or that he’s shirking his responsibilities. There are a lot of factors to consider here. For example, what is he doing with the boys? If they’re occasionally hanging out in the garage and building a train set, or playing ball in the backyard, those are perfectly good bonding activities and your son can only benefit from this quality time he’s spending with his dad (and Dad will benefit too).

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