Monitoring Language Development + Dangers of Casual Sex + Raising Bookworms

[amazon asin=0307952282&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Kenn Apel, coauthor of Beyond Baby Talk.
Topic: Understanding children’s language and literacy development.
Issues: How to evaluate and monitor your child’s spoken language development; enhancing your child’s literacy skills to improve spelling, reading, and writing; recognizing signs of literacy and language problems and know when to get professional help.

[amazon asin=0802450601&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Joe S. McIlhaney Jr., coauthor of Hooked.
Topic: New science on how casual sex is affecting our children.
Issues: Chemicals released in the brain during sex can become addictive; the human brain isn’t fully developed until mid-twenties—until then, it’s harder to make wise relationship decisions; how to steer young people away from making life-changing mistakes.


[amazon asin=098158330X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Emma Walton Hamilton, coauthor of Raising Bookworms,
Topic: Getting kids reading for pleasure and empowerment.
Issues: Why it’s important for kids to grow up with the skills and appetite for reading; studies show that elective reading has declined dramatically over the past 50 years, but in over to participate in today’s and tomorrow’s workplace, young people will need powerful literacy skills to succeed; how to instill a love of reading in children from infants through teens.

Raising Happy, Successful, Cooperative Children–with Less Discipline

[amazon asin=B00A6HR884&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1:Carol Tuttle, author of The Child Whisperer.
Topic: The ultimate guide for raising happy, successful, cooperative children.
Issues:Have a happier, more cooperative child using less discipline; repair troubled parent/teen relationships; know exactly how to best motivate your child; foster more natural confidence and success in your child.

Becoming a Child Whisperer + Army Chaplains + Mentoring Female Servicemembers and Vets

[amazon asin=B00A6HR884&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1:Carol Tuttle, author of The Child Whisperer.
Topic: The ultimate guide for raising happy, successful, cooperative children.
Issues:Have a happier, more cooperative child using less discipline; repair troubled parent/teen relationships; know exactly how to best motivate your child; foster more natural confidence and success in your child.

Interviews with


Breaking away from Cults + Improve Eyesight Naturally + Power of Possible

[amazon asin=B008HAIWIW&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest: Steve Hassan, author of Freedom of Mind.
Topic: Helping loved ones leave controlling people, cults, and beliefs.
Issues: Evaluating the situation; what all cults have in common; understanding the tactics used by cults to recruit and retain members; communicating with a cult member; planning and holding interventions; and much more.


[amazon asin=1591792568&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Meir Schneider, creator of the Natural Vision Improvement Kit.
Topic: Improving eyesight naturally.
Issues: Proven, non-surgical methods of improving eyesight; exercises to increase eye health; what accounts for the growing percentage of children who wear glasses; Meir Schneider’s inspirational story of overcoming blindness using these techniques.


[amazon asin=B0049P24A6&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Auriela McCarthy, author of The Power of the Possible
Topic: How to stop being right and start being happy.
Issues: How to stop arguing over mundane issues like housework; using everyday stories from real people as a way to get you to rethink everything you believe about relationships and how to make them better.

Dad Are Vital—From the Very, Very Beginning

A just-released study shows that three-month old infants who have a strong connection with their father have fewer behavior problems at 12 months. Of course, the phrase “behavior problem” is a bit fuzzy when applied to 12-month olds. So to be more specific, the infants whose dads were actively engaged cried less, were less demanding, and were more social with others than infants whose dads were less engaged. The effect was strongest with sons—but girls benefitted from dad’s engagement too.

[Read more...]

Dating a Divorced Dad: Patience and Bravery Required

Dear Mr. Dad: I’m a sixth grade teacher and one of my students became very attached to me during the school year. Her parents divorced eight years ago and I began emailing with her dad a couple months ago. We started seeing each other but didn’t let many people know because we wanted to wait until school was out. The daughter got wind that something was going on and told her dad it was wrong for him to date her teacher and begged him to date anyone but me. I wasn’t expecting this reaction and we stopped seeing each other. He said he had to do what was in his daughter’s best interest. I completely disagree with this, because the girl has not liked any of the past girlfriends either. I’m absolutely devastated. He thinks she’ll come around now that school is over but I don’t think that’s ever going to happen. Is there any hope? What should I do?

A: Being a single dad myself, I can assure you that dating a divorced father is never easy (that’s what women I’ve dated have said and I know I’m not the only one…). We come with plenty of baggage and there are always unforeseen complications. Plus, children tend to be very protective of their dads (interestingly, they’re often more protective of dads than moms—perhaps because they see that moms already enjoy much more social support than dads).

Part of problem may be that the girl feels betrayed by you. Because the two of you had such a strong bond during the year, chances are good that she looked at you with admiration and respect and even considered you a friend. To have you suddenly dating her father might have made her feel that you were just using her to get to her dad.

It’s also possible that the girl is worried about betraying her mother. Most kids with divorced parents secretly hope that mom and dad will get back together—even if the divorce happened long, long ago. And there’s nothing like having dad start dating someone else to show a child that (a) she has no control over the situation, and (b) that her fantasy of a reunited family might never happen. So the fact that the girl really likes you muddles things even more by making her feel that she’s actually helping shatter he own dream.

As far as the dad goes, you need to understand that his first responsibility (and loyalty) will always be to his child—as it should be. And while it’s certainly worth trying to convince him to give things another go, his primary motivation will be to do what’s right for his daughter, whatever that looks like to him.

One thing you can do to help both dad and daughter come to grips with the situation is to slow the relationship down. In other words, be friends instead of dating each other. While it would have been better to have started the relationship from this angle, going the friend route now might work by giving everyone a little extra time to get used to the new dynamic.

At the same time, be sure to give dad and daughter some space to talk things over alone. I know you want to be there to give your side of the story and try to show them that you’ve got the best of intentions, but don’t.

Dating a divorced dad can be frustrating and infuriating, and the key to success is being very, very patient. Rushing things will only backfire.