Picture books can boost your child’s vocabulary

Interesting story reported by the Indo-Asian News Service. A study has claimed books having photographs but no words prove ideal for building children’s language skills. And, the parents can help their kids the best if they used such books for the bedtime story.

According to experts, parents turning to wordless storybooks end up spending time discussing the pictures and answering their toddler’s questions — exposing them to complicated words, Daily Mail reported.

Psychologists from the University of Waterloo, Canada, looked at 25 mothers as they read their children a set of bedtime stories.

They found the mothers used more advanced language when they picked up a picture book compared to a book with words.

Study author Daniela O’Neill said: “Too often parents will dismiss picture storybooks, especially when they are wordless, as not real reading or just for fun.

“But these findings show that reading picture storybooks with kids exposes them to the kind of talk that is really important for children to hear.”

O’Neill said while reading the picture story, “we would hear mums say things such as ‘where do you think the squirrel is going to go?’ or ‘we saw a squirrel this morning in the backyard’.”
“But we didn’t hear this kind of complex talk as often with vocabulary books, where mentioning just the name of the animal, for example, was more common.”
However, O’Neill also said books of all kinds could build children’s language and literacy skills, “but they do so perhaps in different ways”.

The article originally appeared here.

Monitoring Language Development + Dangers of Casual Sex + Raising Bookworms

[amazon asin=0307952282&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Kenn Apel, coauthor of Beyond Baby Talk.
Topic: Understanding children’s language and literacy development.
Issues: How to evaluate and monitor your child’s spoken language development; enhancing your child’s literacy skills to improve spelling, reading, and writing; recognizing signs of literacy and language problems and know when to get professional help.

[amazon asin=0802450601&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Joe S. McIlhaney Jr., coauthor of Hooked.
Topic: New science on how casual sex is affecting our children.
Issues: Chemicals released in the brain during sex can become addictive; the human brain isn’t fully developed until mid-twenties—until then, it’s harder to make wise relationship decisions; how to steer young people away from making life-changing mistakes.


[amazon asin=098158330X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Emma Walton Hamilton, coauthor of Raising Bookworms,
Topic: Getting kids reading for pleasure and empowerment.
Issues: Why it’s important for kids to grow up with the skills and appetite for reading; studies show that elective reading has declined dramatically over the past 50 years, but in over to participate in today’s and tomorrow’s workplace, young people will need powerful literacy skills to succeed; how to instill a love of reading in children from infants through teens.

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