Mind-Body Medicine + Sittercity + Tutor.com + The Big Disconnect

[amazon asin=0143115510&template=thumbleft&chan=default]James Gordon, Founder and Director of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine, and author of Unstuck: Your Guide to the Seven-Stage Journey our of Depression.


Lauren Tarasewicz, Military Program Manager for Sittercity



Maureen Haney, Program Manager for Tutor.com for U.S. Military Families



[amazon asin=0062082426&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Catherine Steiner-Adair, author of The Big Disconnect.
Topic:
Protecting childhood and family relationships in the digital age.
Issues: How technology can put children’s development at risk; how tech is keeping children from forming close interactions with the adults in their life; insights and advice that can help parents achieve greater understanding, authority, and confidence when dealing with their kids and technology.

Helping Socially Challenged Teens Make Friends + Warrior Canines + DCoE + Homes for Our Troops

Daddy's Deployed Mommy's Deployed

[amazon asin=1118127218&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Elizabeth Laugeson, author of The Science of Making Friends.
Topic:
Helping socially challenged teens and young adults.
Issues: Rules and steps for social skills; ideas for parents to assist in improving conversations; how to expand social opportunities; handling peer rejection and bullying; developing and enhancing friendships.


warrior canine connectionRick Yount, Executive Director, Warrior Canine Connection, warriorcanineconnection.org/


DCoEGeorge Lamb, Outreach Chief, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE), www.dcoe.mil/


Homes for Our TroopsLarry Gill, Veterans Liaison, Homes for Our Troops, www.hfotusa.org/

Modern Fatherhood: Changing, but Not Necessarily for the Better

emergency births can lead to ptsd for dads

Two of the most cherished parts of becoming a modern father—witnessing the birth of his baby and cutting the umbilical cord—are coming under attack.

In the first case, researchers at Oxford University found that some dads who witnessed life-threatening, traumatic, or especially complicated labors and births were more affected by what they’d seen than the women who actually went through it. So affected, in fact, that they were diagnosed with PTSD, a condition that’s usually associated with combat veterans or people who’ve undergone major trauma—exactly what a lot of these new dads have done.

emergency births can lead to ptsd for modern fathersNow, before you scoff, consider a typical emergency scenario (if there is such a thing) where the modern father is suddenly faced with an unconscious, bleeding wife, abruptly pushed out of the way by medical staff, and left alone outside an operating room with little or no information about her fate or that of the baby, fearing the worst and not being able to help. “For the dads, it’s extremely vivid because they are fully aware of what’s going on” said As lead researcher Professor Marian Knight put it in an interview with Britain’s Independent newspaper. “Many of these emergencies involve severe bleeding… “Often, we’re running around trying to save mum’s life, but we need to be thinking about dads as well.”

modern fathers should wait before cutting the cord to reduce blood lossNow, on to the cord cutting–another staple of modern fatherhood. Not to worry, dads, you’ll still be able to do it. But experts are suggesting that you wait until the cord stops pulsating. The reason, say doctors in England, is that up to a third of the baby’s blood supply is still in the umbilical cord and placenta and cutting the cord immediately could lower the baby’s iron levels for as long as six months. Iron levels have been linked in some research with brain development. By waiting for 30 seconds to five minutes, you’ll be ensure that your baby’s tank has been fully topped off. There are some medical conditions that require that the cord be cut immediately.

If you’re interested in delaying the cord cut for a few minutes after the birth, talk it over with the nursing staff and doctors early. But be flexible. If they feel it needs to be done sooner, do it. If you’re intrigued by the idea of waiting, you might also want to check out what’s being called lotus births (Google it), where the umbilical cord doesn’t get cut for as long as 10 days. Sounds a little extreme to me, but some new-agey moms swear by it. Definitely not for everyone. But I suppose as long as it isn’t dangerous, it’s okay.

PTSD: Affects Vets’ Spouses Too

According to the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), about 25 percent of vets returning from the recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq are suffering from PTSD. That’s about 500,000 veterans. If we include family members, that number more than doubles.  Not surprisingly, returning veterans—particularly those with PTSD—have a higher divorce rate than non-veterans. And [...]

PTSD Affects Vets’ Families Too

ptsd affects vets' families too

Dear Mr. Dad: A few months ago, my husband got back from his 3rd Army deployment—two in Iraq, one in Afghanistan. He’s been diagnosed with PTSD and is getting treatment. But I’m worried that his condition is somehow rubbing off on the rest of the family. Our children are having problems in school, I’m finding myself on edge and agitated all the time, and my temper seems to be getting shorter by the minute. I used to think that if we survived three deployments we could survive anything. But now I’m not so sure. What can I do?

A: First, I want to thank you, your husband, and your kids for your service. What you’re writing about is, sadly, getting more and more common. According to the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), about 25 percent of vets returning from the recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq are suffering from PTSD. That’s about 500,000 veterans. If we include family members, that number more than doubles.

[Read more...]

Nurturing Is For Men Too

Many men in our fast-paced, production-oriented culture have no experience of what being truly nurtured feels like.  Being able to nurture yourself is the heart of renewal. The nurturing process is essential to an open, clear, free mind, as well as being the foundation for a supple, resilient, unstressed physical body, and for emotional stability. [...]

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