Boundaries in an Overconnected World + Distance Education + Army Resilience Training

[amazon asin=B00F8LP87Q&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Anne Katherine, author of Boundaries in an Overconnected World.
Topic:
Setting limits to preserve your focus, privacy, relationships, and sanity
Issues: Making social media, smart phones, and other devices work for you rather than against; tips to keep you focused at work and home; how to tell whether you’ve got a tech boundary problem; protecting your identity and your reputation; what to do if you can’t set boundaries for yourself (or your family).

Stephen Judd, Manager, Information Technology and Distance Education


MSG Jennifer Loredo, Master Resilience Trainer

Empty Nest Road Trip + Digital Privacy under Attack

[amazon asin=B00AB0XRCW&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Bruce Sallan, author of The Empty-Nest Road Trip Blues .
Topic: Taking a child to college—from the dad’s point of view.
Issues: An 8-day, 3000-mile father-son trip to talk about life, the future, and the past.


[amazon asin=1588168581&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 2: Davin Coburn, author of Who’s Spying on You?.
Topic: The looming threat to your privacy, identity, and family in the digital age.
Issues: How to prevent every move from being tracked on your smartphone; which phones offer the most protection; how avoiding EZpass, Zigbee wireless devices , and Android phones can help protect privacy; how to keep medical and pharmaceutical records private and avoid identity theft; warning signs of hacking or compromised security.

Empty Nest Blues + Invasions of Privacy + Asthma and Allergies + Healing Childhood Epidemics

[amazon asin=B00AB0XRCW&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Bruce Sallan, author of The Empty-Nest Road Trip Blues .
Topic: Taking a child to college—from the dad’s point of view.
Issues: An 8-day, 3000-mile father-son trip to talk about life, the future, and the past.


[amazon asin=1588168581&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 2: Davin Coburn, author of Who’s Spying on You?.
Topic: The looming threat to your privacy, identity, and family in the digital age.
Issues: How to prevent every move from being tracked on your smartphone; which phones offer the most protection; how avoiding EZpass, Zigbee wireless devices , and Android phones can help protect privacy; how to keep medical and pharmaceutical records private and avoid identity theft; warning signs of hacking or compromised security.


Guest 3: Robert Dietz an allergist and spokesman for the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.
Topic: Asthma and allergies.
Issues: The increase in children suffering from asthma and allergies; treatment options; free asthma screenings nationwide (for info see http://www.acaai.org/).


[amazon asin=0345494512&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 4: Kenneth Bock, author of Healing the New Childhood Epidemics.
Topic: ADD and autism.
Issues: The huge increase in the number of children diagnosed with ADD and autism; understanding the roles that diet, lifestyle, and toxins play in causing ADD and autism; prescription and non-prescription solutions that can reduce or eliminate symptoms.

Privacy on Line? Good Luck Finding an App for That

Dear Mr. Dad: Like a lot of people, I sometimes let my 8-year old play with my smart phone while I’m driving. I’ve got things set up so he can’t download any apps by himself, but he’s talked me into a getting a bunch for him. It just hit me the other day that I don’t think I’ve ever seen any privacy policy notices with the apps. How do I know they aren’t spying on us?
A: Unfortunately, you don’t.  And given that 85% of Americans have a cell phone, (45% have smartphones) and 25% have tablets, your question is an excellent one. The good news is that we tend to take our privacy pretty seriously. A September, 2012 Pew report found that than half of app users “decided to not install a cell phone app when they discovered how much personal information they would need to share in order to use it,” And 30% of app users have “uninstalled an app that was already on their cell phone because they learned it was collecting personal information that they didn’t wish to share.”

Looking for On-line Privacy? Unfortunately, There’s No App for That

Nearly a year ago (February, 2012), staff at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a report called Mobile Apps for Kids: Current Privacy Disclosures are Disappointing in which they found that little or no information on privacy practices or interactive features of mobile apps was made available to parents before those apps were downloaded from either the Apple or Android app stores. The results, as the title of the report indicate, were disappointing.

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