Lessons from a Military Family + Boys Should Be Boys + Debunking Medical Myths

[amazon asin=1401324878&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Sarah Smiley, author of Dinner with the Smileys.
Topic:
One military family, one year of heroes, and lessons for a lifetime
Issues: The heartwarming story of a family’s commitment to fill a deployed servicemember’s place at the family dinner table with interesting people–teachers, Olympians, politicians, athletes, authors, comedians, and more.


[amazon asin=034551369X&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Meg Meeker, author of Boys Should Be Boys.
Topic:
Secrets to raising healthy sons.
Issues: Why moody and rebellious boys are not normal; single sex education; teaching boys to survive in a world that doesn’t value masculinity; what parents and teachers can do to support and encourage boys.


[amazon asin=0446508802&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Guest 2: Lara Zibners, author of If Your Kid Eats This Book, Everything Will Still Be Okay.
Topic:
How to know if your child’s illness or injury is really an emergency.
Issues: There’s no such thing as a fever that’s too high; You don’t really need to keep a child awake after a head injury; Why car seats are important—even if you’re “just going around the corner”; Ear infections don’t require antibiotics; and more myths debunked

Apps for Dads? We Got ‘Em–for F.r.e.e!

mrdad on pregnancy -- the ONLY app for expectant fathers

As some of you may know, we’ve started turning the content from my bestselling books (waaaay more than a million copies sold!) into great apps for dads. The first one, “Mr. Dad on Pregnancy,” is based on The Expectant Father and in just three months has had more than 15,000 downloads. You can get that app–at no charge–in the Apple App Store by clicking here. “Mr. Dad on Pregnancy” is a fun, interactive, and entertaining way for dads-to-be and their partner to learn everything they need to know about pregnancy and childbirth. It’s the perfect Father’s Day present.

But that’s not all…

Keep an eye out for two new apps for dads: “Mr. Dad on Babies” (which is based on the sequel to The Expectant Father, The New Father: A Dad’s Guide to the First Year) and “Mr. Dad on Military Dads” (which is based on The Military Father: A Hands-on Guide for Deployed Dads). We’re hoping to have both out before Father’s Day.

Please contact us if you’re interested in in-app advertising or sponsorships. The rapidly growing audience for our apps for dads is extremely targeted. Every player is a guy who truly wants to be an actively involved father–and he’ll be looking for tools, resources, and yes, products to help him achieve that goal.

Standing By — Coping with Deployment

[amazon asin=0399163794&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Alison Buckholtz, author of Standing By.
Topic:
The making of an American military family in a time of war.
Issues: Adjusting to the unfamiliar (and sometimes unwelcome) role of military wife; the quiet battle military spouses wage to hold their families together during a loved one’s deployment; challenging one’s assumptions about military, motherhood, and even American citizenship.

PTSD: Affects Vets’ Spouses Too

According to the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), about 25 percent of vets returning from the recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq are suffering from PTSD. That’s about 500,000 veterans. If we include family members, that number more than doubles.  Not surprisingly, returning veterans—particularly those with PTSD—have a higher divorce rate than non-veterans. And [...]

PTSD Affects Vets’ Families Too

ptsd affects vets' families too

Dear Mr. Dad: A few months ago, my husband got back from his 3rd Army deployment—two in Iraq, one in Afghanistan. He’s been diagnosed with PTSD and is getting treatment. But I’m worried that his condition is somehow rubbing off on the rest of the family. Our children are having problems in school, I’m finding myself on edge and agitated all the time, and my temper seems to be getting shorter by the minute. I used to think that if we survived three deployments we could survive anything. But now I’m not so sure. What can I do?

A: First, I want to thank you, your husband, and your kids for your service. What you’re writing about is, sadly, getting more and more common. According to the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), about 25 percent of vets returning from the recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq are suffering from PTSD. That’s about 500,000 veterans. If we include family members, that number more than doubles.

[Read more...]

Very nice profile of me in “Stars and Stripes”

The Military FatherTerri Barnes, who writes the “Spouse Calls” column for Stars and Stripes, just did a very nice profile of me. We talked about my work with dads in general and, more specifically, with military dads. Read on…

Fatherly advice

By TERRI BARNES
Published: January 22, 2013

Armin Brott isn’t an active duty Marine anymore, but as a father, veteran, writer and radio personality, he is still fighting the good fight. He said he wages an “ongoing battle” to convince men that fathering is as important as mothering.

“Dads and moms do things differently,” he said. “We have this idea that moms are better, but we’re just different.”

Brott is the author of several parenting books, including “The Military Father,” and is the host of “Positive Parenting” on American Forces Network radio. A shorter version, for civilian audiences, has been on the air for about 17 years. For the past two years, Brott has been producing a second segment for AFN focusing more on military family issues.

As a veteran, Brott sympathizes with active duty fathers and their challenges. Deployment and other extended separations can undermine a military father’s confidence in his role, which makes rejoining his family harder than it already is, Brott said.

“A great part of a man’s identity is feeling loved and needed by his family. If  [men] don’t feel needed and we don’t feel wanted, then what’s the point?” he said. [Read more...]