Understanding and Loving Your Emerging Adult + No More Sleepless Nights + Dads Get the Blues

[amazon asin=0761162410&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Elizabeth Fishel, coauthor of When Will My Grown-Up Kid Grow Up?
Topic:
Loving and understanding your emerging adult.
Issues: The zigzagging road to adulthood; the college years; the boomerang kid; the bank of mom and dad; when things go wrong; having–and enforcing–expectations; emerging at last.


[amazon asin=B001G8WQU2&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Jodi Mindell, author of Sleep Deprived No More.
Topic: Helping you and your baby sleep through the night, from pregnancy to early motherhood
Issues: Determining how much sleep your body needs; catching up on lost sleep; getting babies to sleep through the night; understanding sleep problems faced by school-age kids, tweens, and teens.


Dr. Will Courtenay, a psychotherapist and creator of
www.saddaddy.com
Topic: Even new dads get the blues.
Issues: What is paternal post partum depression? How big a problem is it? What are the causes? When men can do to prevent and/or treat it?

“Why’d You Pull Me Over, Officer? I Didn’t Do Anything,”

Cops who pull drivers over for traffic violations have heard every excuse imaginable—and some that probably aren’t. In most cases, the driver pleads ignorance (I didn’t know, I didn’t see it, who, me?), but the kind of claimed ignorance depends on whether the driver is a man or a woman, according to Insurance.com’s latest “Ticketmaster” [...]

Reluctantly Related + Secret Lives of Men + Parenting ADD

[amazon asin=098881000X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Deanna Brann, author of Reluctantly Related
Topic:
Secrets to getting along with your mother-in-law or daughter-in-law
Issues: Understanding why your relationship with your in-law is so hard; powerful tools and techniques to bring peace and lasting change to your relationship; how to change your relationship without having to confront your in-law; what husbands and sons can do to stay out of the middle.


[amazon asin=0757306608&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Christopher Blazina, author of The Secret Lives of Men
Topic:
What men want you to know about love, sex, and relationships
Issues: The differences between the way men and women think; understanding that different is different—it doesn’t mean better or worse.


[amazon asin=0345497775&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Edward Hallowell, coauthor of Superparenting for ADD.
Topic:
An innovative approach to raising your distracted child.
Issues: How to tune out the diagnosticians and labelers and simply notice and nurture the spirit of your child; learning to recognize the strengths and positive traits of ADD; helping children develop self- and social awareness.

Eating Disorders and Weak Bones: Not Just for Girls

boys can have anorexia and other eating disorders too

Dear Mr. Dad: As a child, my son used to be quite a bit overweight—his pediatrician said he was borderline obese. About a year ago, though, he started losing weight. He looked great and seemed happier with himself. But he kept on losing weight, long after he needed to. Thinking he might be ill, we took him to the doctor who couldn’t find any medial issues. After another few months, he was absolutely emaciated. His pediatrician did a bunch of tests but still couldn’t find anything wrong. The daughter of some good friends of ours had anorexia and was in a treatment facility for a while. I asked the doctor whether our son could possibly have an eating disorder but he said boys don’t get it. Is he right?

A: Might be time for a new pediatrician. Even though we think of eating disorders as affecting only girls, the fact is that about a third of the country’s 30-million people who suffer from one are male. Unfortunately, there are a number of issues that make it very difficult for these boys and young men to get the help they desperately need. First, most medical professionals—like your son’s pediatrician—don’t even consider it. Even mental health professionals, who really should know better, have a tough time acknowledging it. The American Psychiatric Association, for example, has a nice section on its website devoted to eating disorders, but if you look at the list of symptoms of anorexia, the first one is “Menstrual periods cease.” So, almost by definition, there’s no way a boy could possibly be anorexic. The second symptom—“Osteopenia or osteoporosis (thinning of the bones) through loss of calcium”—is yet another condition that’s generally considered to be a women’s condition.

[Read more...]

Learning the Facts About Breast Cancer and Debunking the Myths

The phrase “breast cancer” can be plenty scary–to the person who receives the diagnosis as well as to the family. But thanks to incredibly awareness campaigns and advances in medical technology, quite often, breast cancer is treatable.  In this guest post, Jamie Pratt, sheds some much needed light on this disease.

For many of us, hearing the words breast cancer conjures up a dismal picture. Any form of cancer is a frightening thought, and breast cancer affects not only the stricken individual, but loved ones as well. Breast cancer awareness is designed to educate everyone, just as this unforgiving disease touches all walks of life. This awareness may be in the form of promotional items, educational websites and pamphlets, or simply word of mouth. Having access to the necessary tools, such as forums or cancer risk assessments, can make a difference. Annual mammograms, primarily for women past the age of 45, is essential in helping to detect breast cancer early on.

[Read more...]

This Might Hurt: American Academy of Pediatrics Will Change Its Policy on Circumcision

In what is will undoubtedly cause quite a stir, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) will change its policy on infant circumcision of boys, acknowledging that the health benefits of circumcision outweigh the risks. [Read more...]

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