Navigating Early Development in Today’s Girls

Louise Greenspan and Juliana Deardorff, co-authors of The New Puberty.
Topic:
How to navigate early development in today’s girls.
Issues: Why girls are developing earlier and what it means for their long-term health; things that can trigger early puberty (excess body fat, hormone-mimicing chemicals, emotional stressors at home); strategies to help prevent and/or manage early puberty.

Employed and At-Home Moms + The New Puberty


Deborah Kahn, author of The Roads Taken.
Topic:
Complex lives of employed and at-home mothers.
Issues: Is there an ideal work status? why do mothers change–or not change–their work status? can we really have it all? who gives us support? advantages and disadvantage of working or being at home; where do we go from here?

Louise Greenspan and Juliana Deardorff, co-authors of The New Puberty.
Topic:
How to navigate early development in today’s girls.
Issues: Why girls are developing earlier and what it means for their long-term health; things that can trigger early puberty (excess body fat, hormone-mimicing chemicals, emotional stressors at home); strategies to help prevent and/or manage early puberty.

Are Organic Foods More Nutritious than Non-Organics? Ah, Nope.

Just because a food is pesticide-free doesn’t mean it’s necessarily more nutritious, according to a study just published by the American Academy of Pediatricsp (AAP). Dr. Janet Silverstein, a professor at the University of Florida found that there is actually no nutritional difference between pesticide-free and foods that are traditionally produced. Silverstein and her colleagues analyzed a number of factors, including the effects of hormones on the food and exposure to chemicals, and even the environmental impact. And their results applied to dairy products, meats, and produce.

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Put Down That Phone and Back Away Real Slowly

Dear Mr. Dad: This may sound paranoid, but all of a sudden I’m getting worried about electricity. My wife, three kids—ages 9-16—and I have smartphones. We’ve also got laptops, a wireless router, wireless phones, Bluetooth headsets, remotes, printers, satellite TV, Wii, Kindles, and about 25 other electronic gadgets spread out all over the house. I’m can’t believe that we aren’t being damaged in some way. Am I crazy?

A: Okay, have you been hacking my email? I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about the same thing—and I have a feeling there are a lot more like us out there. In fact, just a few weeks ago, I received two books in the mail—both painting a very ugly picture of electronic pollution. I’ve barely been able to sleep since.
In “Disconnect,” scientist Devra Davis focuses on cell phone radiation and what she believes (and shows pretty convincingly) the industry has done bury the bad news. Health writer Ann Louise Gittleman, author of “Zapped,” also tackles cell phones, but she goes even further, pointing out that potentially dangerous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are and lurking in places we’d never suspect: wall outlets, electric blankets, dimmer switches, hair dryers, iPod docking stations, refrigerators, electric razors, digital cameras, and even those electronic collars dogs wear that let them through their doggy doors.
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