Formula Feeding Your Baby without Fear

[amazon asin=B009S7O084&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Suzanne Barston, author of Bottled Up.

Topic: How the way we feed babies has come to define motherhood–and why it shouldn’t.

Issues: Breastfeeding rates are steadily rising in the US, but by three months after the birth, 64% of women are either supplementing with formula or have ceased to breastfeed completely; giving support and guidance for parents who feed their babies formula.

Breastfeeding Isn’t for Everyone + Avoiding Toxins in Pregnancy + Stress-Free Mealtimes

[amazon asin=B009S7O084&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Suzanne Barston, author of Bottled Up.

Topic: How the way we feed babies has come to define motherhood–and why it shouldn’t.

Issues: Breastfeeding rates are steadily rising in the US, but by three months after the birth, 64% of women are either supplementing with formula or have ceased to breastfeed completely; giving support and guidance for parents who feed their babies formula.


[amazon asin=B001O2NEE2&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 2: Lynda Fassa, author of Green Babies, Sage Moms .

Topic: Raising an organic baby.

Issues: What to avoid during pregnancy and beyond; finding and using products that are not toxic to mom and/or baby, including foods, pesticides, cleaning products, toys, nail polish, and even hair dryers.


[amazon asin=1600940161&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 3: Cheryl Fraker, author of Food Chaining.

Topic: The kid-tested solution for stress-free mealtimes.

Issues: The difference between normal, pick, and problem eaters; How to help your child enjoy new and nutritious foods—no matter how picky an eater he is; preventing food aversions before they develop; what parents can do at home to deal with eating, and what they’ll need professional help with.

5 Best Math Museums In America

Math can be a crashing bore–or it can be incredibly fun, engaging, and exciting. It all depends who’s doing the teaching. In this guest post, Noelle takes us on a tour of five museums that bring math to life–and get kids (and by “kids” I mean anyone from about 2-102) excited about learning. That right there makes them worth the price of admission.

Math is one of the easiest subjects to learn while traveling. Our natural world surrounds us with math, and learning it opens a whole new perspective on the planet we live in and the forms that inhabit it. Geometry in particular can be taught on the road, by looking at architecture and solving equations relating to it. For parents traveling with younger children, try quizzing them often on their math skills to keep their abilities up to par. Another interesting way to learn about math while on the road is to take your family to exciting mathematical museums around the world. Here are a few of the best in the United States:
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Breastfeeding Dad

Dear Mr. Dad: My baby’s mom and I are separated and I hardly ever get to see my 9-month old son because my ex is breastfeeding. Isn’t there some way I can spend more than just a few hours at a time with him?

A: Feeding your baby is a wonderful way for the two of you to bond with each other. And yes, there are some ways for you to increase your time with him. But before we get to that, it’s important to acknowledge that your ex is doing a fantastic thing for your son.

Current recommendations are that babies should have nothing but breast milk for the first six months of life, then, over the next six months, gradually phase out the milk and phase in solid food. As you may have heard, breastfed babies have stronger immune systems, are less likely to develop ear infections or pneumonia, and may even have higher IQs. Keep in mind, though, that it’s not the act of breastfeeding that gives babies all these advantages; it’s the actual breast milk itself.

Most mothers will express, or pump, their breast milk using a breast pump. The milk can stay in the refrigerator for up to a week or be frozen for several months. Later, when your baby is with you, you’ll give him that milk in a bottle. Using pumped breast milk will allow you to take your son overnight—but you and your ex will have to cooperate. Unfortunately, using a breast pump can make women feel like a cow. And pumps aren’t cheap (they can cost as much as $350). She can rent one, but long term, that will end up costing even more. If your ex won’t provide breast milk, you could give your baby formula—if your pediatrician agrees—until he hits 12 months, which is when he can start drinking cow’s milk. But your wife would still need to pump when the baby’s with you to keep up her milk supply.

If your son has never had a bottle, introducing one might be tricky. Here are some tips:

  • Practice. Don’t wait until you have your son for a full day before trying a bottle. Drinking from a bottle is different than breastfeeding so give your baby a chance to get the hang of it.
  • Offer a bottle a little earlier than his regular feeding time so he’s not starving.
  • Ask your ex to go somewhere else while you’re introducing the bottle. Babies can smell their mothers up to 20 feet away and he may not want to try something new if he can smell her breast
  • Don’t force it. If your son resists, try again a little later. You might also try putting some breast milk on the nipple of the bottle, experimenting with a different type of nipple, or changing positions.
  • If your son flat out refuses to take a bottle, try putting the milk in a sippy cup.

Most babies your son’s age have already started eating at least some solid foods (although “solid” is hardly the right word—“soupy” or “mushy” would be closer). In fact, it’s possible that several of his daytime snacks and feedings in a row consist entirely of baby food (the kind you can buy in the grocery store). This opens up the opportunity for you to take your son for a pretty good stretch. However, to quickly identify allergies, introduce new foods slowly—one at a time every few days. And make sure you and your ex are sharing this information with each other.