How To Get Hired Outside Your Major

In college, you had no trouble selecting a major that interested you, and after graduation you were fortunate to find a well-paying job that related directly to your degree. Now, several years later, you are ready for a career change, but you are understandably unsure if you can find a new job outside of your area of expertise.

Take heart—as Career Advice notes, by following some tips and advice, it is very possible to land a plum position in an industry that is outside of your college major. For example, consider the following:

Get Experience Through an Internship

For people who are considering switching to a new career, try getting some on-the-job experience prior to sending out applications. For example, if you are currently employed in the financial industry but dream of working in an IT department, see if you can land an evening internship at a local technology company. If you aren’t sure where to look, Internships.com helps place people in almost 80,000 internship positions with over 56,000 companies. Interning in your desired new field will not only help you land a future job, it can also show you quite clearly if this career is right for you.

Gain Knowledge Through Education

Depending on what new career you want to pursue, it might be prudent to take some classes to learn more about the industry and the skills needed to succeed. If you are unsure how you can balance your current job with classes, an online school might be your best option as you can complete classes at night or on the weekends. College Online is one of many resources that can connect you with over 100 online schools and 2,000-plus degrees, which will help you choose a program suited to your needs.

Take Stock of Your Skills

As you prepare to interview for a new job, remember that you are far more than your degree. Make a list of all of your strengths and skills that go far beyond your job title or what it says on your diploma, notes Career Realism. For example, if you majored in telecommunications and film and currently work for a television station, you probably have interviewed and trained new people, organized staff events, learned new computer programs and given presentations about industry-related topics. These skills are sure to impress future employers, and show that you have experience that goes far beyond your college major.

An honest assessment of your many skills should also come into play when composing your new resume. Focus on creating a skills-based resume rather than an education-based resume, explains Investopedia. To do this, start by listing the tasks you have learned and been responsible for at work, and then note how you completed these responsibilities. This will show future employers that you have an abundance of problem-solving and organizational skills.

Understand That You May Be a Small Fish Again

You might be the head of the math department at your local high school, but if you want to change careers, you should be prepared to start at the bottom and work your way up again. In other words, be willing to swallow your pride—at least a bit—and remind yourself that you will need time and experience in your new career to be successful. This positive, can-do attitude is sure to impress potential employers during the job interview process.

Automotive Careers Abound, If You Know Where to Look

automotive careers

Let’s face it, the best career involving four wheels and an engine block is a race car driver or a big shot engineer. But if you don’t have Speed Racer driving skills or a Henry Ford brain, plenty of unique and fun automotive careers are still abound. You just have to know what you’re looking for.

Mechanic

Perhaps the most obvious career path to take if you want to be hands-on with autos is becoming a mechanic. The average salaries for mechanics across the U.S. are trending upward, according to U.S. News. The median salary for a mechanic has steadily risen from just more than $30,000 in 2004 to almost $40,000 in 2012.

Mechanics are in high demand in cities like Detroit, San Francisco and Fairbanks, but a mechanic can go just about anywhere there are vehicles and find a job.

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Dad or Alive

[amazon asin=0451413334&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Adrian Kulp, author of Dad or Alive.
Topic:
Confessions of a stay-at-home dad.
Issues: One man’s hilarious journey from bringing home the bacon to frying it–along with assembling the crib, learning how to “accessorize” his daughter, flying with an infant for the first time, booze-free baby showers, and navigating a farmer’s market with a baby–and a loaded diaper–strapped to his chest.

Confessions of an Unexpected Stay-at-Home Dad + Dad’s Search for the Meaning of Life + Nutrition Deficit Disorder

[amazon asin=0451413334&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Adrian Kulp, author of Dad or Alive.
Topic:
Confessions of a stay-at-home dad.
Issues: One man’s hilarious journey from bringing home the bacon to frying it–along with assembling the crib, learning how to “accessorize” his daughter, flying with an infant for the first time, booze-free baby showers, and navigating a farmer’s market with a baby–and a loaded diaper–strapped to his chest.


[amazon asin=1602396493&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Joe Kita, author of The Father’s Guide to the Meaning of Life.
Topic:
What being a dad teaches about hope, love, patience, pride, and everyday wonder.
Issues: The life lessons parents learn—that would remain secrets if they didn’t have children; essential reading for fathers; the importance of play (and not just for the kids); what our children teach us about ourselves and how they make us better people.


[amazon asin=0316043443&template=thumbleft&chan=default]William Sears, author of The NDD Book.
Topic:
Nutritional Deficit Disorder.
Issues: Identifying NDD; understanding how NDD affects children’s learning, behavior, and health—and what we can do about it; overcoming NDD without drugs; how to fit a healthy, fresh-food diet into today’s busy lifestyle.

Raising Amazing Adolescents and Teens + Job Hunting Success for Teens

[amazon asin=B0064XB8CG&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Tom Sturges, author of Grow the Tree You Got.
Topic: 100 ideas for raising amazing adolescents and teenagers.
Issues: Learning to let go; the importance of making mistakes; punishing with kindness; what rivers can teach us about adolescents; seven ways to keep the peace.


[amazon asin=145057842X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Abby Kohut, author of Absolutely Abby’s 101 Job Search Secrets.
Topic: Success tips for teen job seekers and their parents.
Issues: Why you’re on a Never Ending Interview whether you know it or not; How to be resilient in the face of rejection; The importance of LinkedIn, Twitter & Facebook to your job search; How and why you should interview your next boss; How to use retro technology as part of your new strategy.

Loving the Teen You’ve Got + Job Hunting for Teens + When to Worry + Eating Disorders

[amazon asin=B0064XB8CG&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Tom Sturges, author of Grow the Tree You Got.
Topic: 100 ideas for raising amazing adolescents and teenagers.
Issues: Learning to let go; the importance of making mistakes; punishing with kindness; what rivers can teach us about adolescents; seven ways to keep the peace.


[amazon asin=145057842X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Abby Kohut, author of Absolutely Abby’s 101 Job Search Secrets.
Topic: Success tips for teen job seekers and their parents.
Issues: Why you’re on a Never Ending Interview whether you know it or not; How to be resilient in the face of rejection; The importance of LinkedIn, Twitter & Facebook to your job search; How and why you should interview your next boss; How to use retro technology as part of your new strategy.


[amazon asin=0814473636&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Lisa Boesky, author of When to Worry.
Topic: How to tell if your teen needs help and what to do about it.
Issues: How to spot the warning signs of serious problems like depression, cutting, bipolar disorder, and drug abuse; specific dos and don’ts for decreasing teen struggles and suffering in the family; how and where to get professional help.


[amazon asin=B003P9XDOS&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 4: Marcia Herrin, author of The Parent’s Guide to Eating Disorders.
Topic: Supporting self-esteem, healthy eating, and positive body image.
Issues: THow to broach the subject with your child; why blame doesn’t work; how to tell bad eating habits from dangerous behavior; the Maudsley Method: what it is and how parents can use it to treat their children.