Sheryl is Wrong: Bossy’s Fine. Let’s Ban Double Standards Instead

ban lies

As the father of three daughters, I support Sheryl Sandberg’s message that girls can lead. But I don’t support her other messages: First, it’s okay to use half-truths, twisted data, inaccurate and outdated information, and outright lies to get what you want. Second, women and girls aren’t smart enough to make their own life choices. Third, you don’t need to work hard to achieve success—the world owes you something just because you’re female.

Here are just a few examples.
Sandberg wants “equality” in the workplace, and drags out the old canard that there’s a male/female pay gap—and that that gap is the result of discrimination against women. The truth? Yes, the total amount of money earned by men is greater than the total earned by women. But that is largely a function of the different choices men and women make. Men put in about 50% more hours at work than women and, more importantly, men dominate in fields where there is less flexibility, more danger, and higher salaries, while women dominate in fields that offer more flexibility and, unfortunately, less income.

So, Sheryl, how much workplace equality do you really want? Ninety-five percent of people who die on the job are men. And two thirds of the unemployed are men. Where’s the outrage, Sheryl? Do you really want equal representation for males and females?
[Read more...]

Discrimination in classroom discipline? Gee, what a surprise.

The US Department of Education confirmed what a lot of people have been saying for years: Black students—especially boys—are disciplined much more harshly than other students. The study looked at public school kids kindergarten through 12th grade. According the Department of Ed, only 18 percent of students were black, but they accounted for 35 percent of those suspended once, almost half of those suspended more than once, and almost 40 percent of all expulsions. Twice as many boys (1 in 5) were suspended as girls (1 in 10).

[Read more...]

Overcoming prejudice

Dear Mr. Dad: My son is in middle school and comes home with stories about witnessing discrimination and hearing bigoted comments from other students. How can we keep him from picking up these attitudes himself?

A: Now that the United States has just inaugurated our first African-American President (no, David and Wayne Palmer on the TV show “24” don’t count), it’s tempting to think that we’ve moved beyond prejudice. If only it were that easy. Unfortunately, the progress we make as a society doesn’t always reflect what’s going on in the hearts and minds of individuals. Prejudice—in all sorts of forms—is still all around us.
[Read more...]