Calming Chaos and Nurturing Your Child’s Developing Mind


Daniel Siegel, author of No-Drama Discipline.
Topic:
Calming the chaos and nurturing your child’s developing mind.
Issues: how to identify your discipline philosophy; best ways to communicate the lessons you want to teach; facts on brain development and what kind of discipline is appropriate for each age; how to calmly and lovingly connect with a child—no matter how extreme the behavior; navigating your child through tantrums; discipline mistakes we all make.

Respect Your Children + No-Drama Discipline


Jay Scott Fitter, author of Respect Your Children.
Topic:
A practical guide to effective parenting.
Issues: Getting out of bad communication ruts with your kids; why giving advice rarely works—and what to do instead; best and worse ways to deal with negative behavior; how to help kids learn good values without lecturing; getting kids to do the right thing without punishing them.


Daniel Siegel, author of No-Drama Discipline.
Topic:
Calming the chaos and nurturing your child’s developing mind.
Issues: how to identify your discipline philosophy; best ways to communicate the lessons you want to teach; facts on brain development and what kind of discipline is appropriate for each age; how to calmly and lovingly connect with a child—no matter how extreme the behavior; navigating your child through tantrums; discipline mistakes we all make.

Understanding yourself and others + Wonders of parenting today + Saying “No” in a Yes culture

Ken Keis, author of Why Aren’t You More Like Me?
Topic: The secrets to understanding yourself and others.
Issues: Why certain kinds of people irritate you—and what you can do about it; increase team compatibility and leadership effectiveness; stop feeling offended and emotionally hooked; select the right job style for yourself; understand and encourage your spouse and children.



Neal Pollack, author of Alternadad.
Topic: The wonders, terrors, and idiocy of parenting today.
Issues: How today’s young parents are different from those of previous generations; how unorthodox parents are becoming the mainstream; maintaining your pre-baby life after becoming a parent.



David Walsh, author of No.
Topic: Why kids of all ages need to hear it and ways parents can say it.
Issues: Do your children suffer from Discipline Deficit Disorder? Saying NO in a YES culture; three myths about self-esteem; why letting kids feel bad sometimes is a good idea; consequences of giving kids everything they want.

Getting Your Kids to Cooperate without Losing Your Cool

Rona Renner, RN., author of Is that Me Yelling?
Topic:
Getting your kids to cooperate without losing your cool.
Issues: becoming aware of yourself; understanding everyday triggers; adapting your parenting style to your child’s temperament; dealing with the yeller in your family; dealing with difficult situations, disorders, and differences.

How to Teach Your Child to Live a Disciplined Life

By Shefali Tsabary, PhD

It’s been said that the only things we really learn are the things we learn for ourselves. That’s because only when we learn it for ourselves does it become intrinsic to us. We just naturally do it, without having to be coaxed or disciplined. The key to raising a self-disciplined child is for them to learn for themselves—a process we undercut when we impose the lesson on them.

As a clinical psychologist working with families, I’ve found that children learn best from consequences, whereas punishment generates resentment. A child who is punished may fall in line, but their heart isn’t in it. They don’t learn to be self-disciplined—which is why so many of our kids have a traumatic time in their teens.
[Read more...]

When Tempers Flare

Dear Mr. Dad: My son is six, and he’s still having temper tantrums. Call me crazy, but I thought they would have petered out long ago. Most of the other parents we know say their kids stopped having tantrums when they were two or three. But my son is giving no indication that he’s going to relent anytime soon. What should we do? How long do we have to wait for him to stop?

A: Since you asked for it, I’ll tell you: You’re crazy. If you think you can just sit around and wait for your son to grow out of throwing tantrums, you’re going to be very, very disappointed and frustrated. In fact, given how long this has lasted, there’s a good chance that you and your spouse are the reason your son is still having tantrums in the first place. The only way to bring his reign of terror to an end is for you to step in and start doing something about it. Now.
[Read more...]