Emotional First Aid

[amazon asin=1594631204&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Guy Winch, author of Emotional First Aid.
Topic:
Practical strategies for treating failure, rejection, guilt, and other psychological injuries
Issues: How to ease the sharp pain of rejection; how to stop the devastating ache of loneliness or disappointment of failure; how to recover from low-self-esteem or loss; how to deal with nagging guilt; much more

Overcoming Psychological Injuries + Homefront United + Military Spouse Network + 11 Military Mompreneurs

Military One Click

[amazon asin=1594631204&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Guy Winch, author of Emotional First Aid.
Topic:
Practical strategies for treating failure, rejection, guilt, and other psychological injuries
Issues: How to ease the sharp pain of rejection; how to stop the devastating ache of loneliness or disappointment of failure; how to recover from low-self-esteem or loss; how to deal with nagging guilt; much more


Homefront United NetworkAngela Caban, founder, Homefront United Network, homefrontunited.com/


National Military Spouse NetworkSue Hoppin, founder, National Military Spouse Network, www.nationalmilitaryspousenetwork.org/



MSB New MediaAdriana Domingos-Lupher, co-founder, MSB Net Media, msbnewmedia.com/


Dumbell FitnessChristina Bell Landry, owner, DumBell Fitness, dumbellfitness.com/


Daddy's Deployed Mommy's DeployedBridget Platt, CEO and founder, Daddy’s Deployed and Mommy’s Deployed, daddysdeployed.com/


Military One ClickJennifer Pilcher, founder and CEO, MilitaryOneClick.com, militaryoneclick.com/


Powerhouse PlanningJessica Bertsch, president of Powerhouse Planning, www.powerhouseplanning.com/


Women Veterans InteractiveGinger Miller, founder and CEO, Women Veterans Interactive, www.womenveteransinteractive.org/


Nomades CollectionChristy DeWitt, Sales Manager, Nomades, nomadescollection.com


R. RiveterKellie Dudley, R. Riveter, www.rriveter.com/


LockNLoad JavaLori Churchhill, co-founder, Locknload Java, locknloadjava.com/


My Military LifeWendy Polling, My Military Life/Military Life Radio, mymilitarylife.com/


The Military Spouse CoachKrista Wells, The Military Spouse Coach, themilitaryspousecoach.com/

Of Course I Love You, Honey—I Just Don’t Like You

Dear Mr. Dad: Outside of the home, I’m a fairly calm, patient, level-headed person. At home, I’m impatient, angry, and yell a lot at my kids. I’m actively involved in their activities, but rarely find anything that they do very interesting. And efforts that I make to expose them to things I enjoy (tennis, baseball) always seem to backfire to the point that I regret making the effort. My problem is that I love my kids, but don’t necessarily like them. I know they’ll only be young for a short time and I should try to enjoy them while I can. But, honestly, I think I enjoy them less than five percent of the time. So my question is this: What can I do to enjoy my family more?

A: Wow. That can’t have been an easy email to write. But you very eloquently captured a feeling just about every parent has had (or will have). Very few people have the courage to admit it, though, so thanks for that. You didn’t say how old your children are, but there are several factors that may be contributing to your I-love-you-but-don’t-like-you feeling.
First, there’s their behavior. Dealing with rude, surly, uncooperative, disrespectful children on a regular basis can definitely make you question whether you should have had children in the first place.

Second, as children get older, they naturally push for more independence. If you aren’t able to gradually let go, you may feel useless, unloved, and angry that you’re being pushed away. This is especially true if you’re dealing with pre-teens and teens, who seem to feel that the best way to assert their independence is to inflict emotional damage on their parents.

Third, the expectations you have for your children—for example, their ability to play tennis and baseball—may be out of whack with what they’re actually physically or mentally able to do.

What to do?

  • Think hard. There’s a big difference between not liking your children and not liking their behavior. Sometimes it’s hard to separate the two, but it’s important to try.
  • Read up on temperament. Some kids are naturally easier to get along with than others. In addition, certain parent-child personality combinations are more explosive than others. Understanding your child’s—and your—temperament can really help.
  • Read up on child development. Understanding what’s normal and what’s not for children your kids’ age, should increase your patience and enjoyment levels.
  • To be blunt, grow up a little. If you feel that you’ve made major sacrifices for your children (giving up hobbies or interests, spending ungodly amounts of money on private schools, etc), you may resent them. Yelling and seeing them as disappointing or irritating could be your way of getting back at them. But this is your life. Start learning to accept the things you can’t change, and focus instead on changing the things you can (your attitude, for example, or the need to transition from “daddy who knows everything” to “daddy the mentor who gives advice when it’s asked for”). There’s a good chance that your kids will eventually grow out of their behavior issues, and grow into being able to perform the way you think they should. But if you stay on the track you’re on, you’ll have destroyed any hope for a good relationship with them long before that happens. That said, the fact that you care enough about them and being a good dad to write, makes me think you’ll never let things get that far.

Don’t Make the Kids Choose Sides

Dear Mr. Dad: How do I find a way to forgive my 22-year old daughter for attending the marriage of her mother and the man she had an affair with. I have tried and tried and it’s just not in me. I felt my daughter should have informed her mother that she could not attend out of respect for me.

A: I know it’s hard, but you need to take a deep breath and let it go. The fact that your daughter attended her mother’s wedding has nothing to do with the way she feels about you. I’m sure she knows exactly what happened between you and her mother but like it or not, she loves her mother–lousy behavior and all.
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