Dinner with Heroes

www.amazon.co.ukSarah Smiley, author of Dinner with the Smileys.
Topic:
One military family, one year of heroes, and lessons for a lifetime
Issues: The heartwarming story of a family’s commitment to fill a deployed servicemember’s place at the family dinner table with interesting people–teachers, Olympians, politicians, athletes, authors, comedians, and more.

Lessons from a Military Family + Boys Should Be Boys + Debunking Medical Myths

www.amazon.co.ukSarah Smiley, author of Dinner with the Smileys.
Topic:
One military family, one year of heroes, and lessons for a lifetime
Issues: The heartwarming story of a family’s commitment to fill a deployed servicemember’s place at the family dinner table with interesting people–teachers, Olympians, politicians, athletes, authors, comedians, and more.


www.amazon.co.ukMeg Meeker, author of Boys Should Be Boys.
Topic:
Secrets to raising healthy sons.
Issues: Why moody and rebellious boys are not normal; single sex education; teaching boys to survive in a world that doesn’t value masculinity; what parents and teachers can do to support and encourage boys.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 2: Lara Zibners, author of If Your Kid Eats This Book, Everything Will Still Be Okay.
Topic:
How to know if your child’s illness or injury is really an emergency.
Issues: There’s no such thing as a fever that’s too high; You don’t really need to keep a child awake after a head injury; Why car seats are important—even if you’re “just going around the corner”; Ear infections don’t require antibiotics; and more myths debunked

Does father (or mother) still know best? Sorry, now Google does.

Remember when your kids would come to you with every question they had and they’d lap up your wisdom like hungry puppies? Those days are gone. Today, the majority of children would rather ask Google their pressing questions than mom or dad.

Yep, that’s what a new study conducted by Birmingham Science City in the UK, just found. Of children 6-15, 54% said they’d ask Google before mom, dad, or a teacher. Put a little differently, only 25% percent of kids that age said they’d ask mom or dad before Google.

 

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