The Human Spark

[amazon asin=0465029825&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Jerome Kagan, author of The Human Spark.
Topic:
The science of human development.
Issues: Why claims of the impact of attachment are based on misinterpreted research; the intertwined development of language and morality; the limited effects of childhood on later life; the role that culture and historical era play in an individual’s development of traits.

The Science of Human Development + Talent Code + Marriage in the US

[amazon asin=0465029825&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Jerome Kagan, author of The Human Spark.
Topic:
The science of human development.
Issues: Why claims of the impact of attachment are based on misinterpreted research; the intertwined development of language and morality; the limited effects of childhood on later life; the role that culture and historical era play in an individual’s development of traits.


[amazon asin=055380684X&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Daniel Coyle, author of The Talent Code
Topic: Greatness isn’t born, it’s grown.
Issues: The three elements of the talent code: deep practice, ignition, and master coaching; How to identify and encourage deep practice; motivational tools used by the worlds greatest teachers and motivators; how to recognize a growing skill


[amazon asin=0307386384&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Andrew Cherlin, author of The Marriage-Go-Round
Topic: The state of marriage and the family in America Today
Issues: Why religious Americans have a higher divorce rate than non-religious ones; the battle over same-sex marriages; why government support of marriage (over $100 million spent per year!) doesn’t produce the desired results.

Differences between Newborns and Babies

[amazon asin=0520267125&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Susan Brink, author of The Fourth Trimester
Topic:
Understanding, protecting, and nurturing an infant through the first three months
Issues: The differences between newborns and babies (it’s more than you think); what does the world of the newborn sound like, look like, feel like? How newborns communicate their needs; how parents instinctive responses contribute to brain development.

P&G is Dissing Dads. Again. Please sign the petition!

Four years ago, at the Beijing Olympic Games, Procter & Gamble’s ad campaign was “Proud Spstickonsor of Moms.” I complained loud and long about that one—how leaving dads out in such a glaring way was insulting and demeaning.

Now they’re back, and are ramping up their insulting, demeaning message a few notches. P&G’s campaign for the upcoming London Summer Olympics? “Thank you, Mom.” Excuse me? Only mom? Again? Really? How ’bout “Thank you, Mom and Dad.” Apparently not. As far as P&G is concerned, dads simply don’t exist.

Frankly, I’ve had enough. I’ve spent more than 15 years looking at—and critiquing—advertisers’  portrayals of fathers, and like most dads, I find that the majority of advertising is rather irrelevant to me. But there’s a difference between creating ads that are irrelevant and creating ads that completely deny that fathers exist. (Even Jif peanut butter, famous for their “Choosy Mothers Choose Jif” slogan, occasionally proclaims that “Choosy Mothers and Fathers Choose Jif.”) As a single dad, I do all the shopping for my family and I’ve spent a lot of money on P&G brands over the years. But as far as I’m concerned, P&G no longer exists. I’m taking my wallet elsewhere.

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Oh, Boy, Dad, It’s Time to Talk about Girl Stuff

Dear Mr. Dad: My wife is in the Army and just deployed overseas, where she’ll be for a year. Our daughter is 11 and I’m worried that she’ll start her cycle while my wife is away. I don’t know what to tell her about her body. What do I do?

A: As the father of three daughters, I know exactly what you’re going through. The whole female puberty thing makes a lot of guys squeamish. But the good news is that it’s really not that difficult—especially since your daughter most likely won’t include you on her top ten list of people to get advice on puberty from anyway.
So your first assignment is to find an adult woman to run point. This could be a relative, friend, or even one of the female spouses whose husband is deployed with your wife’s unit. Whoever she is, she’ll be able to walk your daughter through the basics and give you a list of supplies you’ll want to have on hand.
But this doesn’t mean you can back away completely. As odd as it sounds, you actually have a very important role to play here (more on that below). That’s why you should learn as much as you can about girls’ puberty, just in case things don’t go exactly according to plan (and when was the last time they did?) Here’s a quick overview:
The process begins somewhere between ages 8 and 14. Your daughter will start to develop breasts, she’ll start growing hair on her genitals and under her arms, her skin may start breaking out, and eventually she’ll start menstruating. The whole thing usually takes from 18 months to as long as 7 or 8 years to complete. If your daughter seems to be starting at the very early end of the age range or hasn’t started by the end of the range, have a talk with her pediatrician.
Your daughter may feel fat, embarrassed, and uncomfortable in her new body. She may be constantly comparing her rate of development to that of her girlfriends and, if she’s started early, she may have to deal with some increased attention from boys—attention she may not be psychologically ready for.
Here’s where you come in. A lot of dads aren’t sure how to behave around their pubescent daughters and opt to back away physically—as if they’re worried about doing something inappropriate. Don’t do that. Your daughter needs to know that what she’s going through is normal and that you, the most important male in her life, love her whether he body is changing or not. If you push her away (literally or figuratively), no matter how good your intentions, she’s going to feel rejected. It’s also important that you keep talking to her—not about puberty, just about what’s going on in her life. Tell her you love her. A lot. And spend plenty of dad-daughter time together. Not taking an interest in this way is—in her mind—another sign of rejection.
Daughters who have close relationships with their fathers do better in school, are more likely to go to college, are less likely to get pregnant or use drugs, and have better mental health (less depression and anxiety and better self-esteem). In addition, researchers at Vanderbilt University found that girls whose dads are actively involved in caregiving start puberty later than girls who have more distant—or non-existent—relationships. One of their theories is that pheromones from biologically related males suppress puberty, while those from unrelated males might accelerate it.

The Real Poop on Toilet Training

Dear Mr. Dad: My son seems to have no interest in potty training. He’s almost 3 and many kids in his pre-school already use the potty. My wife says we shouldn’t push him, but I don’t want him to be the only one left in diapers. What’s the right age to start potty training and how can we I encourage my son?

A: Some children are completely out of diapers by age two, others can take years longer, so there’s nothing about your son’s age that automatically makes him “too old” for diapers. The bottom line, so to speak, is that your son will start when he’s ready. Pushing him may actually hinder the process.
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