Helping Struggling Students + Say This, Not That


Barbara Dianis, author of Don’t Count Me Out!
Topic:
Better grades and test scores for kids with educational difficulties.
Issues: Building strong bonds between academically struggling students and parents as they learn to understand and alleviate educational issues.

 


Carl Alasko, author of Say This, Not That.
Topic:
How to always say the right thing at the right time.
Issues: The five rules of effective communication; what to say–and not say–in stressful situations; exploring the biology behind communication; how to avoid spilling emotional blood.

Ethics for Kids

www.amazon.co.ukMichael Parker, author of Talk with Your Kids.
Topic:
Conversations about ethics and more.
Issues: Where do kids get their values? Why learning to think consciously about ethics is at least important to our children as academic learning; Conversation starters about honesty, friendships, sensitivity, fairness, dedication, and more; ground rules for conversations with your kids.

Morality and Ethics + Drilling for Manood + Overcoming Perfectionism

www.amazon.co.ukMichael Parker, author of Talk with Your Kids.
Topic:
Conversations about ethics and more.
Issues: Where do kids get their values? Why learning to think consciously about ethics is at least important to our children as academic learning; Conversation starters about honesty, friendships, sensitivity, fairness, dedication, and more; ground rules for conversations with your kids.


www.amazon.co.ukJohn Croyle, author of The Two-Minute Drill to Manhood.
Topic:
A proven game plan for raising sons.
Issues: The seven actionable principles of M-A-N-H-O-O-D: Master, Ask and listen; Never compromise; Handle your business; One purpose; One body; Don’t ever give up.


www.amazon.co.ukAnn W. Smith, author of Overcoming Perfectionism.
Topic:
Finding the key to balance and self-acceptance.
Issues: The key differences between overt and covert perfectionism; the role early attachment temperament, sibling relationships, and life circumstances play in develping patterns of perfectionism; how to create change and a more fulfilling life.

Planning for Uncomfortable-but-Important Conversations

www.amazon.co.ukSue Sanders, author of Mom, I’m Not a Kid Anymore.
Topic:
Navigating 25 inevitable conversations that arrive before you know it.
Issues: How not to be blindsided by your child’s pre-teen years; tough conversations like, “You and Dad do that?” “Did you ever smoke marijuana?” “Can I get American Eagle jeans?” and “Do these shorts make my butt look big?”

Inevitable Conversations + Getting Twins to Sleep + Launching Adult Children

www.amazon.co.ukSue Sanders, author of Mom, I’m Not a Kid Anymore.
Topic:
Navigating 25 inevitable conversations that arrive before you know it.
Issues: How not to be blindsided by your child’s pre-teen years; tough conversations like, “You and Dad do that?” “Did you ever smoke marijuana?” “Can I get American Eagle jeans?” and “Do these shorts make my butt look big?”

www.amazon.co.ukMarc Weissbluth, author of Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Twins.
Topic: Sleep training your multiples.
Issues: The difference between healthy sleep and junk sleep; why it’s important for babies to learn to fall asleep unassisted; tips for synchronizing twins’ sleep schedules; recognizing early drowsiness clues so you can catch the sleep wave before it’s too late…

Ellen Gibran-Hesse, author of Failure to Launch.
Topic: How to get teens and young adults to independence.
Issues: Guide your teen to the life and job skills needed to be independent; helping a college student structure their college experience so they’re employable after graduation; helping teens and young adults develop money management skills; how to do all that and still maintain close relationships.

Picture books can boost your child’s vocabulary

Interesting story reported by the Indo-Asian News Service. A study has claimed books having photographs but no words prove ideal for building children’s language skills. And, the parents can help their kids the best if they used such books for the bedtime story.

According to experts, parents turning to wordless storybooks end up spending time discussing the pictures and answering their toddler’s questions — exposing them to complicated words, Daily Mail reported.

Psychologists from the University of Waterloo, Canada, looked at 25 mothers as they read their children a set of bedtime stories.

They found the mothers used more advanced language when they picked up a picture book compared to a book with words.

Study author Daniela O’Neill said: “Too often parents will dismiss picture storybooks, especially when they are wordless, as not real reading or just for fun.

“But these findings show that reading picture storybooks with kids exposes them to the kind of talk that is really important for children to hear.”

O’Neill said while reading the picture story, “we would hear mums say things such as ‘where do you think the squirrel is going to go?’ or ‘we saw a squirrel this morning in the backyard’.”
“But we didn’t hear this kind of complex talk as often with vocabulary books, where mentioning just the name of the animal, for example, was more common.”
However, O’Neill also said books of all kinds could build children’s language and literacy skills, “but they do so perhaps in different ways”.

The article originally appeared here.