Organ Donation + Childhood Unbound + Improve Family Communication

[amazon asin=0800721888&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Todd and Tara Storch, authors of Taylor’s Gift.
Topic:
A courageous story of giving life and renewing hope.
Issues: Dealing with the question no parent every wants to hear: “Would you be willing to donate your child’s organs?” Overcoming grief at the loss of a child.

[amazon asin=1416559280&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Ron Taffel, author of Childhood Unbound.
Topic:
Saving our kids’ best selves–confident parenting in a world of change
Issues: Guiding children of all ages in ways that bring out the best in kids and parents; understanding our children in 21st century terms; how to encourage the good while steering the kids away from the bad.

[amazon asin=1884734685&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Susie Leonard Weller, author of Why Don’t You Understand.
Topic:
Improve family communication
Issues: Understanding the four basic thinking styles: Logical, Creative, Practical, and Relational; what to do when someone’s style is driving you crazy, how to parent a child who marches to a different drummer.

Encouraging Character and Curiosity + Navy Chaplains

Guest 1: Rick Ackerly, author of The Genius in Every Child.
Topic: Encouraging character, curiosity, and creativity in children.
Issues: How focusing on character, curiosity, and creativity at a young age lights the path to a successful life and academic achievement; how parents and teachers can build self-worth and confidence; the importance of allowing children to take on challenges, learn from disappointment, and take on responsibility.

Guest 2: Chaplain Dale White, CAPT, Operations Officer, Office of the Chief of Navy Chaplains. Additional Resources:

A Single Dad’s Guide to His Daughter’s Puberty

I’m a single dad and my daughter is 11. I know I’m going to have some kind of discussion with her about puberty, but I don’t have a clue where to begin. I also don’t know what and how much I should say to my daughter about her body and about sexual feelings she is going to start to experience. Help!

Congratulations! You’re about to deal with something that most dads spend a lot of time worrying about. Luckily, though, it really isn’t all that bad.

Whether you’re a custodial dad or you share custody, it’s reasonably safe to assume that your ex will be having some discussions about puberty and menstruation with your daughter. But sometimes things don’t work out exactly the way you planned. Even if they do, it’s a good idea for you to prepare yourself to deal with these issues anyway. Women’s bodies have always been something of a mystery to most men and it’s perfectly normal to be confused, embarrassed, or even somewhat put off by your daughter’s physical changes.
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Communicating With Your Spouse

Ever since our baby was born, it seems like my wife and I are growing apart from each other. We hardly even talk anymore. She’s a stay-at-home mom, and I work a lot. We used to be great at communication, talking to each other about our days, discussing our child and what she is learning. I’m afraid our relationship isn’t as strong as it used to be. What happened?

Nearly all new parents experience a drop in the quality of their communication. Half the time it’s permanent. Here are some of the factors that researchers have found contribute to this decline in couples’ communication skills:
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From the “Well, Doh!” department

New study out shows that having kids lowers marital satisfaction. Actually, there have been a lot of studies that show the same thing. But this one, which tracked over 200 couples for eight years, found that 90 percent of them experienced a drop off in happiness after having children.

Geez, what do you expect when all personal growth and development goes out the window, there’s no sex, no sleep, and you’re on the all-kids-all-the-time channel.

So how do you stay in the top 10%? Got to find something–anything–to talk about besides the baby/child. Lots to choose from–wars, the economy, the housing bubble, whether you should trade in your iPad2 for a 3. That’s my commentary. More info on the recent satisfaction study at: http://yourlife.usatoday.com/sex-relationships/story/2012-03-07/Years-of-research-point-to-strain-kids-put-on-relationships/53403700/1

I’m Only Going to Say This 100 More Times…

Dear Mr. Dad: We’ve tried to stress the importance of study habits to our 12-year-old son. But no matter what we do or say, he seems to end up playing video games instead of doing his homework. What can we do to make him start taking studying seriously?

A: Whoa. Before we get to the homework thing, we need to talk about the real issue: What can you do to get your son to start taking YOU seriously? The simplest approach (although, I admit that it’s not going to be easy) is to take away the video games. Whether it’s confiscating his DS or tablet, locking up his game controllers, or activating the parental controls on his computer, you need to take some firm steps right now. Your son is still young, but if he doesn’t start taking schoolwork more seriously soon, his grades may interfere with his post-high-school education and, eventually, his choice of career.

If possible, get your son involved in the discussion—have him suggest ways he can earn back his gaming time. The more the rules come from him, the greater the chance that he’ll follow them. But make sure he’s got things in the right order. Schoolwork first, then games. No exceptions.

Okay, back to homework—but again, we have to start with a different question: When did this behavior start? If he’s never had any interest in studying, that’s one thing (and we’ll get to that in a minute). But if this is a relatively new development, you need to figure out what’s going on.

Has anything in your son’s life changed recently? Did you just move to a new neighborhood? Could he be having a problem with a teacher? Is there any possibility that he’s being bullied at school? Have you and your spouse been fighting a lot or are you getting divorced? Any of these can cause significant—but usually temporary—changes in study habits.

Your assignment is to get answers to these and other similar questions that could be influencing your son’s schoolwork. This is going to involve spending more one-on-one time with your son and learning about his life and how he feels about things.

The temptation is to sit him down and start grilling him, face to face. Don’t. It’s hard for a teen to interpret that kind of approach as anything but hostile. Instead, start by asking him general questions about school, friends, music and other non-explosive topics. And do this while you’re driving. There’s something about not having to look at each other that can remove some of the barrier to communication. If you listen carefully and resist the urge to lecture, you may get the answers to your questions without actually having to come right out and ask them. And in the process, you’ll be strengthening your relationship with each other.

Now, what if he’s ever been interested in studying? Is it possible that he’s not getting enough intellectual stimulation? This is big. A child who finds schoolwork to be boring may simply tune out.

If it’s not that, communicating with your son will still be the goal, but there’s a twist. In this case, you’ll try to find ways to build on his natural interests. For example, if he loves sports or mechanics or cooking or whatever, start there. And then find ways to introduce math or science or language arts principles through those interests. Showing him that what he’s learning has some actual real-world applications will make it a lot more interesting—and worth working on.