How To Get Hired Outside Your Major

In college, you had no trouble selecting a major that interested you, and after graduation you were fortunate to find a well-paying job that related directly to your degree. Now, several years later, you are ready for a career change, but you are understandably unsure if you can find a new job outside of your area of expertise.

Take heart—as Career Advice notes, by following some tips and advice, it is very possible to land a plum position in an industry that is outside of your college major. For example, consider the following:

Get Experience Through an Internship

For people who are considering switching to a new career, try getting some on-the-job experience prior to sending out applications. For example, if you are currently employed in the financial industry but dream of working in an IT department, see if you can land an evening internship at a local technology company. If you aren’t sure where to look, Internships.com helps place people in almost 80,000 internship positions with over 56,000 companies. Interning in your desired new field will not only help you land a future job, it can also show you quite clearly if this career is right for you.

Gain Knowledge Through Education

Depending on what new career you want to pursue, it might be prudent to take some classes to learn more about the industry and the skills needed to succeed. If you are unsure how you can balance your current job with classes, an online school might be your best option as you can complete classes at night or on the weekends. College Online is one of many resources that can connect you with over 100 online schools and 2,000-plus degrees, which will help you choose a program suited to your needs.

Take Stock of Your Skills

As you prepare to interview for a new job, remember that you are far more than your degree. Make a list of all of your strengths and skills that go far beyond your job title or what it says on your diploma, notes Career Realism. For example, if you majored in telecommunications and film and currently work for a television station, you probably have interviewed and trained new people, organized staff events, learned new computer programs and given presentations about industry-related topics. These skills are sure to impress future employers, and show that you have experience that goes far beyond your college major.

An honest assessment of your many skills should also come into play when composing your new resume. Focus on creating a skills-based resume rather than an education-based resume, explains Investopedia. To do this, start by listing the tasks you have learned and been responsible for at work, and then note how you completed these responsibilities. This will show future employers that you have an abundance of problem-solving and organizational skills.

Understand That You May Be a Small Fish Again

You might be the head of the math department at your local high school, but if you want to change careers, you should be prepared to start at the bottom and work your way up again. In other words, be willing to swallow your pride—at least a bit—and remind yourself that you will need time and experience in your new career to be successful. This positive, can-do attitude is sure to impress potential employers during the job interview process.

Sexual Assault on Campus: A Case of Battered Statistics Syndrome

Dear Mr. Dad: I’ve been reading about the recent White House study showing that one in five women will be the victim of rape at some point in her life. As a mother of twins (a boy and a girl) who are graduating high school, I’m scared for my daughter’s safety and I’m worried that my might do something unspeakable. What can I do to protect both of my children?

A: The first thing to do is calm down. For as much media coverage as the White House study got, it is one of the most flawed, inflammatory, and just plain incorrect pieces of “research” I’ve ever seen.

Let’s start with the numbers. To come up with its 1-in-5 statistic, the White House task force relied on a 2011 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which used a very broad definition of “sexual violence,” Besides forced genital and oral sex (whether by violence, drugs, or threats—the kinds of things that most people would consider rape), the CDC included “forced kissing” and “rubbing up against you in a sexual way, even if it is over your clothes.” That behavior shouldn’t be tolerated. But dirty dancing is not rape. To suggest that it is just plain wrong.

The CDC study also includes as victims of “sexual assault” women who answered Yes when asked whether they had ever had sex with someone who had pressured them by “telling you lies” or by making “false promises about the future they knew were untrue,” or “by showing they were unhappy.” Again, not nice, but regretting a sexual encounter after the fact doesn’t make it rape.

Besides relying on the results of ambiguous questions, the White House also claimed that just 12% of campus sexual assaults are reported—meaning that 88% aren’t. Mark Perry, a professor of economics at the University of Michigan—a guy who know a thing or two about statistics—carefully looked at the data and came up with a very different story. Between 2009 and 2012, there were 137 sexual offenses reported at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. If that’s 12%, the other 88% would be 1,004, bringing the total to 1,141. Dividing that by the 22,330 female students and the University (51.6% of 43,275), reveals that a female student’s actual chance of being sexually assaulted is 5.1%–a quarter of what the what the White House is claiming—and that’s still counting dirty dancing and being lied to as rape.

The report has a number of other flaws. For example, it completely overlooks a growing body of solid research finding that sexual assault on campuses is hardly a one-way street. In fact, young men and young women are equally likely to admit to having pressured someone else into having sex.

But a more serious problem is the report’s recommendations to essentially strip accused male students of their legal rights. The report states that “[t]he parties should not be allowed to personally cross-examine each other.” Um, the Constitution’s 6th Amendment, however, grants anyone accused of any crime anywhere that exact right.
Obviously, this is a much bigger issue than I can tackle here. But the bottom line is this: talk with your son and your daughter about unwanted sexual advances and about the statistical distortions the White House is peddling. As a parent, I’m sure you don’t want your daughter thinking of herself as a victim—and I know you don’t want your son to become a victim of overzealous college administrators who see every young man as a rapist waiting to happen.
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Sheryl is Wrong: Bossy’s Fine. Let’s Ban Double Standards Instead

ban lies

As the father of three daughters, I support Sheryl Sandberg’s message that girls can lead. But I don’t support her other messages: First, it’s okay to use half-truths, twisted data, inaccurate and outdated information, and outright lies to get what you want. Second, women and girls aren’t smart enough to make their own life choices. Third, you don’t need to work hard to achieve success—the world owes you something just because you’re female.

Here are just a few examples.
Sandberg wants “equality” in the workplace, and drags out the old canard that there’s a male/female pay gap—and that that gap is the result of discrimination against women. The truth? Yes, the total amount of money earned by men is greater than the total earned by women. But that is largely a function of the different choices men and women make. Men put in about 50% more hours at work than women and, more importantly, men dominate in fields where there is less flexibility, more danger, and higher salaries, while women dominate in fields that offer more flexibility and, unfortunately, less income.

So, Sheryl, how much workplace equality do you really want? Ninety-five percent of people who die on the job are men. And two thirds of the unemployed are men. Where’s the outrage, Sheryl? Do you really want equal representation for males and females?
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Baby Boomer Translation Guide: 5 Online College Terms You Should Know

When writer Teresa Ambord’s sister returned to college at 50, the experience was nothing like the first time around. As Ambord details in her article for go60.us, her sister was constantly mistaken for a teacher and found it frustrating to be the one fellow students looked to for all the answers — especially since she felt as lost as her younger classmates. When you’re returning to college in your golden years with new-found knowledge on current technology, some back-to-school challenges can be diminished if not eliminated altogether.

If you don’t know where to begin to find an online college offering the courses you’re interested in, try an online resource such as http://www.collegeonline.org. Just enter the degree you want in the field of your choice along with a subject to further narrow the scope, and these sites will match you up with the online colleges that fit best with your needs. Continuing your education online can be easier and more convenient than heading to campus, but there will still be challenges. The jargon might be new to you. Before you enroll and start filling up your class schedule with online courses, familiarize yourself with online college terms to make the transition smooth.

A.N.G.E.L.

The ANGEL—not an ethereal, heavenly creature—colleges are talking about can be considered a blessing to nontraditional and conventional students alike. The acronym signifies “A New Global Environment for Learning.” Essentially, it’s the system your college has in place through which you’ll access your online courses. Different colleges use different systems, so the ANGEL system, or portal, you must learn to navigate could go by any name. Education Dive says Blackboard is the most common Learning Management System, but your college may use another system such as Moodle, GoingOn or Sakai.

Forums and Discussion Boards

Online courses rely on virtual means to connect students with the instructor and each other. When you take online classes, your instructor will direct you to the forum or discussion board on your college’s website to participate in dialogue that would normally take place in a classroom. There, you can read other students’ questions and comments, post some of your own and see what the instructor’s responses. Learning the college lingo will certainly help your understanding. They’re typically not real-time, like chat rooms are, so you will have to check back periodically to catch up on the discussion and find answers to questions you’ve asked.

Hybrid Course

Many of the classes you need for your degree might be online classes, but if some are hybrid courses, be prepared to show your face in class from time to time. Hybrid courses combine the face-to-face interactions of normal classes with the flexibility online courses offer. That means you’ll have to attend a class on-campus from time to time, as well as access your course content online.

Web-Assisted Course

Not to be confused with online and hybrid courses, web-assisted courses rely least on the online aspect. Web-assisted courses are characterized by regular classroom activity and lectures, using the university’s web-based system for occasional information such as accessing notes, the syllabus or evaluations.

Developmental Classes

Developmental classes help you brush up on certain skills. These preparatory courses increase your chances of success in college by developing basic skills you’d like to improve such as grammar, writing or reading.

Technology Overload + The Great Outdoors + College Applications + Good Teens

[amazon asin=1620876361&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Max Strom, author of There is No App for Happiness.
Topic:
How to avoid a near-life experience.
Issues: Technology has expanded at such a rate that nearly every aspect of our world has been affected–but there has been no expansion of personal happiness. Instead, the wealthiest societies have become depressed, anxious, sleep-deprived, and overmedicated.


[amazon asin=0399161082&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Peter Brown Hoffmeister, author of Let Them Be Eaten by Bears.
Topic:
A fearless guide to taking our kids into the great outdoors.
Issues: A simple, practical introduction to hiking, camping, and exploring that will help parents and kids alike feel empowered and capable. So turn off the video games and rediscover the powerful of going out to play.

[amazon asin=0345498925&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Michelle Hernandez, author of Acing the College Application.
Topic:
Maximizing your child’s chances for admission to the college of his or her choice.
Issues: Understanding the Common Application; how the answer to the “Why” question can make or break your application; the truth about what colleges are really looking for in essays; myths and misconceptions about the on-campus interview.


[amazon asin=0307347575&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Richard Lerner, author of The Good Teen.
Topic:
Debunking the negative myths about adolescents.
Issues: Teens have an undeserved bad rap in the media and elsewhere; redefining adolescence; all teens have the potential to develop in healthy ways; the characteristics of a good teen and what parents and others can do to encourage them.

The Nearly Impossible Task of Making College Affordable

you need to put away more for your child's college education

Dear Mr. Dad: Our son just turned 8 and my husband and I have been talking about how we’re going to pay for his college education. We really don’t have a plan. I say that we should take the money out of our retirement accounts, but my husband says we shouldn’t. We’re both feeling completely overwhelmed by the whole college tuition thing. Who’s right?

A: Congratulations! It’s great that you’re having this discussion right now—too many parents put the whole thing off until it’s almost too late. And you’re not alone in feeling overwhelmed. In fact, a recent report called “How America Saves for College 2013” (produced by Sallie Mae, the country’s largest education financial services company) asked parents to describe their feelings about saving for college. The top answers were overwhelmed, annoyed, frustrated, and scared.

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