Sheryl is Wrong: Bossy’s Fine. Let’s Ban Double Standards Instead

ban lies

As the father of three daughters, I support Sheryl Sandberg’s message that girls can lead. But I don’t support her other messages: First, it’s okay to use half-truths, twisted data, inaccurate and outdated information, and outright lies to get what you want. Second, women and girls aren’t smart enough to make their own life choices. Third, you don’t need to work hard to achieve success—the world owes you something just because you’re female.

Here are just a few examples.
Sandberg wants “equality” in the workplace, and drags out the old canard that there’s a male/female pay gap—and that that gap is the result of discrimination against women. The truth? Yes, the total amount of money earned by men is greater than the total earned by women. But that is largely a function of the different choices men and women make. Men put in about 50% more hours at work than women and, more importantly, men dominate in fields where there is less flexibility, more danger, and higher salaries, while women dominate in fields that offer more flexibility and, unfortunately, less income.

So, Sheryl, how much workplace equality do you really want? Ninety-five percent of people who die on the job are men. And two thirds of the unemployed are men. Where’s the outrage, Sheryl? Do you really want equal representation for males and females?
[Read more...]

Baby Boomer Translation Guide: 5 Online College Terms You Should Know

When writer Teresa Ambord’s sister returned to college at 50, the experience was nothing like the first time around. As Ambord details in her article for go60.us, her sister was constantly mistaken for a teacher and found it frustrating to be the one fellow students looked to for all the answers — especially since she felt as lost as her younger classmates. When you’re returning to college in your golden years with new-found knowledge on current technology, some back-to-school challenges can be diminished if not eliminated altogether.

If you don’t know where to begin to find an online college offering the courses you’re interested in, try an online resource such as http://www.collegeonline.org. Just enter the degree you want in the field of your choice along with a subject to further narrow the scope, and these sites will match you up with the online colleges that fit best with your needs. Continuing your education online can be easier and more convenient than heading to campus, but there will still be challenges. The jargon might be new to you. Before you enroll and start filling up your class schedule with online courses, familiarize yourself with online college terms to make the transition smooth.

A.N.G.E.L.

The ANGEL—not an ethereal, heavenly creature—colleges are talking about can be considered a blessing to nontraditional and conventional students alike. The acronym signifies “A New Global Environment for Learning.” Essentially, it’s the system your college has in place through which you’ll access your online courses. Different colleges use different systems, so the ANGEL system, or portal, you must learn to navigate could go by any name. Education Dive says Blackboard is the most common Learning Management System, but your college may use another system such as Moodle, GoingOn or Sakai.

Forums and Discussion Boards

Online courses rely on virtual means to connect students with the instructor and each other. When you take online classes, your instructor will direct you to the forum or discussion board on your college’s website to participate in dialogue that would normally take place in a classroom. There, you can read other students’ questions and comments, post some of your own and see what the instructor’s responses. Learning the college lingo will certainly help your understanding. They’re typically not real-time, like chat rooms are, so you will have to check back periodically to catch up on the discussion and find answers to questions you’ve asked.

Hybrid Course

Many of the classes you need for your degree might be online classes, but if some are hybrid courses, be prepared to show your face in class from time to time. Hybrid courses combine the face-to-face interactions of normal classes with the flexibility online courses offer. That means you’ll have to attend a class on-campus from time to time, as well as access your course content online.

Web-Assisted Course

Not to be confused with online and hybrid courses, web-assisted courses rely least on the online aspect. Web-assisted courses are characterized by regular classroom activity and lectures, using the university’s web-based system for occasional information such as accessing notes, the syllabus or evaluations.

Developmental Classes

Developmental classes help you brush up on certain skills. These preparatory courses increase your chances of success in college by developing basic skills you’d like to improve such as grammar, writing or reading.

Technology Overload + The Great Outdoors + College Applications + Good Teens

[amazon asin=1620876361&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Max Strom, author of There is No App for Happiness.
Topic:
How to avoid a near-life experience.
Issues: Technology has expanded at such a rate that nearly every aspect of our world has been affected–but there has been no expansion of personal happiness. Instead, the wealthiest societies have become depressed, anxious, sleep-deprived, and overmedicated.


[amazon asin=0399161082&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Peter Brown Hoffmeister, author of Let Them Be Eaten by Bears.
Topic:
A fearless guide to taking our kids into the great outdoors.
Issues: A simple, practical introduction to hiking, camping, and exploring that will help parents and kids alike feel empowered and capable. So turn off the video games and rediscover the powerful of going out to play.

[amazon asin=0345498925&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Michelle Hernandez, author of Acing the College Application.
Topic:
Maximizing your child’s chances for admission to the college of his or her choice.
Issues: Understanding the Common Application; how the answer to the “Why” question can make or break your application; the truth about what colleges are really looking for in essays; myths and misconceptions about the on-campus interview.


[amazon asin=0307347575&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Richard Lerner, author of The Good Teen.
Topic:
Debunking the negative myths about adolescents.
Issues: Teens have an undeserved bad rap in the media and elsewhere; redefining adolescence; all teens have the potential to develop in healthy ways; the characteristics of a good teen and what parents and others can do to encourage them.

The Nearly Impossible Task of Making College Affordable

you need to put away more for your child's college education

Dear Mr. Dad: Our son just turned 8 and my husband and I have been talking about how we’re going to pay for his college education. We really don’t have a plan. I say that we should take the money out of our retirement accounts, but my husband says we shouldn’t. We’re both feeling completely overwhelmed by the whole college tuition thing. Who’s right?

A: Congratulations! It’s great that you’re having this discussion right now—too many parents put the whole thing off until it’s almost too late. And you’re not alone in feeling overwhelmed. In fact, a recent report called “How America Saves for College 2013” (produced by Sallie Mae, the country’s largest education financial services company) asked parents to describe their feelings about saving for college. The top answers were overwhelmed, annoyed, frustrated, and scared.

[Read more...]

Empty Nest Road Trip + Digital Privacy under Attack

[amazon asin=B00AB0XRCW&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Bruce Sallan, author of The Empty-Nest Road Trip Blues .
Topic: Taking a child to college—from the dad’s point of view.
Issues: An 8-day, 3000-mile father-son trip to talk about life, the future, and the past.


[amazon asin=1588168581&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 2: Davin Coburn, author of Who’s Spying on You?.
Topic: The looming threat to your privacy, identity, and family in the digital age.
Issues: How to prevent every move from being tracked on your smartphone; which phones offer the most protection; how avoiding EZpass, Zigbee wireless devices , and Android phones can help protect privacy; how to keep medical and pharmaceutical records private and avoid identity theft; warning signs of hacking or compromised security.

Alternatives to ADD Meds + Young Adults in Rehab + Bilingual Advantage + Sending Kids to College

[amazon asin=0393343162&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Marilyn Wedge, author of Pills Are Not for Preschoolers.
Topic: A drug-free approach for troubled kids.
Issues: Understanding that there are almost always alternative treatments methods other than medication for troubled kids; the need to change the language mental health professionals use to classify behaviors and feelings.


[amazon asin=1616492643&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Joseph Lee, author of Recovering My Kid.
Topic: Parenting young adults in treatment and beyond.
Issues: What is addiction? How do we cope when a child returns home from treatment? How can parents support his or her recovery? How can the family be supportive during the recovery process? What if the child relapses?


[amazon asin=1400023343&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Barbara Zurer Pearson, author of Raising a Bilingual Child.
Topic: A step by step guide for parents.
Issues: The tremendous advantages bilinguals have in the business world; the advantages of a bilingual upbringing and how it can enhance a child’s intellectual development; how children learn language and how it differs from the way adults learn.


[amazon asin=0933165161&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 4: Marie Pinak Carr, author of Prepared Parent’s Operational Manual.Topic: What parents need to know before sending a child off to college.
Issues: Getting your child (and yourself) prepared to cope with finances and budgeting, insurance issues, homesickness, long-distance physical illness, roommate troubles; what to do—and how to protect yourself—when the unexpected happens.

%d bloggers like this: