50 Dangerous Things to Do with Your Kids

Gever Tulley, author of of 50 Dangerous Things You Should Let Your Children Do.
Topic: Teaching your children about safety by helping them learn to manage risk.
Issues: Exciting ways for your children (and you) to explore the world around them; melting glass, walking a tightrope, tasting electricity, throwing things out of moving cars, deconstructing appliances, and more.

Dangerous Things to Do with Your Kids + Team Building with Duct Tape + Doing the Right Thing at the Right Time

Gever Tulley, author of of 50 Dangerous Things You Should Let Your Children Do.
Topic: Teaching your children about safety by helping them learn to manage risk.
Issues: Exciting ways for your children (and you) to explore the world around them; melting glass, walking a tightrope, tasting electricity, throwing things out of moving cars, deconstructing appliances, and more.

Tom Heck, author of Duct Tape Teambuilding Games.
Topic: Fun activities to help your team—and your family—stick together.
Issues: Using team-building games and experiential learning to teach leadership, trust, cooperation, creativity, problem solving, and confidence.

John Bradshaw, author of Reclaiming Virtue[.
Topic: How we can develop the moral intelligence to do the right thing at the right time for the right reason.
Issues: The meaning of “inborn moral intelligence” and how we can cultivate it; how we can awaken in our children the desire to be good people; why our attempts to teach virtue fail so often; using movies and other cultural references to teach kids about virtue.

Getting Kids to Listen–without Nagging, Reminding, or Yelling

Guest: Amy McCready, author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time…
Topic:
The revolutionary program that gets your kids to listen without nagging, reminding, or yelling.
Issues: Why it’s so difficult to get kids to listen; how giving your child more power, not less can end power struggles; effective ways to correct misbehavior and bring out the best in your children.

Overcoming Ignoring + Stop Saying “Yes” for the Wrong Reasons + Negotiation Generation

Guest: Amy McCready, author of If I Have to Tell You One More Time…
Topic:
The revolutionary program that gets your kids to listen without nagging, reminding, or yelling.
Issues: Why it’s so difficult to get kids to listen; how giving your child more power, not less can end power struggles; effective ways to correct misbehavior and bring out the best in your children.


Adrianne Ahern, author of Snap out of It Now!
Topic: Four steps to inner joy.
Issues: Learning to understand—and overcome–the reasons people say yes to the wrong relationships, let anger lead them down the wrong path, fail at diets, and believe they aren’t good enough; making a quantum leap to a life of purpose, joy, and excellence.


Lynn Reeves Griffin, author of Negotiation Generation.
Topic: Taking back your parental authority without punishment.
Issues: How to influence your child’s behavior—without controlling it; predicting and preventing challenging behavior; letting go of time outs, grounding, spankings, and other punishments; teaching by example.

4 Macho and Manly Minivans: They Really Do Exist

manly minivans

manly minivans

Over the years, minivans have gotten a bit of a bad rap for their somewhat bland functionality and lack of automotive zest. However, in many ways this assessment is simply not fair. As many minivan drivers know quite well, they are comfortable, roomy and economical ways to cart your family, friends, pets and needed paraphernalia around.

While many moms are more than happy to drive their minivans around the neighborhood, some dads are still a bit reluctant to hop behind the wheel. But as Bankrate notes, there are some minivans that even the most macho and manly dad can appreciate and enjoy driving. For example, consider the following:

[Read more...]

A Personal History of ADHD


Timothy Denevi, author of Hyper.
Topic:
A personal history of ADHD.
Issues: What it’s like to be a boy who can’t stop screaming or fighting or fidgeting; startling stats about ADHD (1/5 of high-school-age boys and 11 percent of all school-age children have been diagnosed with ADHD; the evolution of drug treatments; understanding this complex and controversial diagnosis.