Balancing the Big Stuff + Masterminds and Wingmen


Miriam Liss, co-author of Balancing the Big Stuff.
Topic:
Finding happiness in work, family, and life.
Issues: The search for balance; balancing multiple roles; balance as a parent; balance at work; balance is for men and women; balance at home; societal barriers to balance; beyond balance.


Rosalind Wiseman, author of Masterminds & Wingmen.
Topic:
The new rules of Boy World.
Issues: Popularity and groups; body image; schoolyard power; locker room tests; girlfriends; intimacy; the emotional lives of boys (which are more complex that we’re led to believe; why boys are lagging behind girls in education; why boys are more likely to commit suicide than girls.

Nice Coverage of My Terre Haute, IN Talk on Military Dads

Brott, Military Father

Author Helps Deployed Dads with Home-Front Issues
Brott, Military FatherThis article ran on the AP wire and also appeared in The Military Times.
Oct. 2, 2014

By Howard Greninger
The (Terre Haute, Ind.) Tribune-Star via AP

Staff Sgt. Shawn Oxford of the Indiana Air National Guard said he knows what it’s like to come home after a military deployment.

“Things are definitely different when you come back, such as kids (initially) listening more to the parent who stayed at home. It does take some getting used to, but it is nice to know you are not the only one,” Oxford said.

He was among more than 50 members of the 181st Intelligence Wing Wednesday to hear a presentation from Armin A. Brott, who has written several books for dads, including his book, “The Military Father — A Hands-on Guide for Deployed Dads.” Brott is known as Mr. Dad.

Brott said he decided to write the book after he heard statements such as “my husband just came back from deployment and every time a door slams around here, he dives under a table. Or something from the mom or dad, that their 2-year-old daughter comes up from behind to give a hug, and I almost threw them out a window,” he told the Tribune-Star.

Brott served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1976 to 1978, entering the service at age 17.

In his presentation to the Intelligence Wing at the Terre Haute International Airport-Hulman Field, Brott said there are different challenges facing families in active duty and reserve deployment.

One is finances.

“Young enlisted guys, or girls, are not making a lot of money, and they tend to live on the base,” he said. The young enlisted, Brott said, also tend to be targets of predatory loans and have a high rate of bankruptcy. “The average credit rating for active duty is 592, while the civilian reserve has a 692 credit rating,” he said.

The guard or military reservists may have a good job in their civilian life, but have a lower rank and earning less in the military. “If they get deployed, they have some financial issues to deal with because there is a long stretch of time where they are not making enough money to make ends meet. There is also the opposite effect of someone who has a good military income, but low civilian income. If there is a deployment, they get used to having that extra money and start buying things on credit. But when the deployment is over, they have all those bills to pay, so (they) end up in the same spot with difficulties managing finances,” he said.

Military personnel today also are more likely to see combat. In World War II, about 15 percent of veterans saw combat, while in the Vietnam War it was closer to 30 percent. “In Iraq and Afghanistan, it was closer to 70 to 80 percent who saw combat,” he said. Yet, Brott said, that does not mean there is a bigger connection of those in combat to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, especially when compared with another military problem of suicide, he said.

“Half of the people who commit suicide in the military, and it is a problem, were never deployed. Eighty percent of those committing suicide never saw combat,” he said.

Brott said active duty families often have support of being on bases and with people of similar situations. Reserve-duty dads, when deployed, go through feelings of shock, fear, anger and uncertainty, particularly before a first deployment. At the same time, their spouses can feel withdrawal and an emotional distance.

Capt. John Petrowski said he appreciated that Brott was able to show both sides of the deployed and a spouse at home. “Both face challenges and fears going into deployment. Plus the stress (of the spouse) at home with the kids. We have always said the toughest job is for the person who stays at home,” he said.

Petrowski said technology, such as Skype, can sometimes become too distracting to the person serving overseas, as well as a hardship on the person at home. “If the lawn mower is broken and you are in Afghanistan, it doesn’t do you any good to know that. Let’s just get the lawn mower fixed and not pass that on” to the deployed spouse, Petrowski said.

Brott said children react to deployment and returning from a deployment in different ways. “Yet all kids just want to know how it affects ‘me,’ your going away or your return, how will it affect ‘me.’ They have no other concerns, really and truly,” he said.

For infants, he suggests the deployed person record themselves reading stories. Toddlers do not understand time and can lash out verbally when a parent is gone. Pre-school and elementary children still have “the me thing going. We need to be reassuring that they understand what is going on. Give the child something to hold onto, something of value, so they feel connected to you and feel connected to what you are doing and your return.”

For children age 8 to 12, talking and listening to questions is important. For teens, “they can be sullen, can push you away or have behavioral problems, but the difficulty is being sullen or withdrawing or just being annoying sometimes is basic teen behavior. To separate out what is normal for a teen to what is normal for a teen with a parent who is deployed is difficult. Talking and listening is still important,” he said.

Senior Airman Anna Dennis said she appreciated the presentation. Dennis said that while she does not have children and could not directly relate to that discussion, “I didn’t think about the different ages of children and how they react” to a deployment, Dennis said.

The original article apppeared here.

Raising Healthy and Fit Kids without Diets


Patricia Riba, co-author of Fit Kids Revolution.
Topic:
Raising healthy and fit children without diets.
Issues: What’s wrong with diets; the real reasons kids are overweight; the psychology of feeding children; protecting your child from a toxic world; how to foster an active lifestyle; feeling safe in an unsafe world.

The Art of Fatherhood — Cartoonists Needed

Any cartoonists out there? I need your help (and yes, there’s someting in it for you).

As you may know, I’m doing major revisions of two of my bestselling books, The Expectant Father and The New Father: A Dad’s Guide to the First Year. Both are coming out in the spring of 2015. I want to replace some of the cartoons that are currently in the books and would love to include some from real dads. If you’re interested, we’re having a contest. Cartoons that get selected will get $150 plus full credit in the book (and my undying gratitude). Guidelines are below. Feel free to forrward this to any artistic dads you know.  [Read more...]

Are You in Terre Haute, Indiana?

I’ll be in Terre Haute, Indiana next week giving a series of presentations. If you’re in the neighborhood and can make it, please come by and say Hello! Here’s the schedule:

Wednesday, Oct 1, 2-3pm
Parenting Strategies for Military Dads and Families
181st Intelligence Wing
Air National Guard Base Dining Facility

Wednesday, Oct 1, 7-8pm
Campus event: Thinking about Parenthood
Indiana State University
Hulman Memorial Student Union, Dede 1

Thursday Oct 2, 6:00 – 6:45
Single Parents
Sarah Scott Middle School, Cafeteria
1000 Grant Street
Terre Haute, IN 47802

Healthy Eating Habits + Fit Kids Revolution


Dina Rose, author of It’s Not About the Broccoli.
Topic:
Three habits to teach your kids for a lifetime of healthy eating.
Issues: Teaching children to confidently explore new foods; how kids can know when they’re hungry and when they’re full; how parents can branch out from easy-to-like, easy-to-prepare kids’ means to more mature tastes and textures; the three habits: proportion, variety, moderation.



Patricia Riba, co-author of Fit Kids Revolution.
Topic:
Raising healthy and fit children without diets.
Issues: What’s wrong with diets; the real reasons kids are overweight; the psychology of feeding children; protecting your child from a toxic world; how to foster an active lifestyle; feeling safe in an unsafe world.