Yet Another Reason Breastfeeding is Best

breastfeeding is best

Most of us know that breastfeeding has all sorts of great health benefits for kids, including better immune system function, fewer allergies, and lowered risk of obesity, tooth decay, pneumonia, and ear infections. New research from Tel Aviv University has added one more benefit: protection against ADHD in the teen years.
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Formula Feeding Your Baby without Fear

[amazon asin=B009S7O084&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Suzanne Barston, author of Bottled Up.

Topic: How the way we feed babies has come to define motherhood–and why it shouldn’t.

Issues: Breastfeeding rates are steadily rising in the US, but by three months after the birth, 64% of women are either supplementing with formula or have ceased to breastfeed completely; giving support and guidance for parents who feed their babies formula.

Breastfeeding Isn’t for Everyone + Avoiding Toxins in Pregnancy + Stress-Free Mealtimes

[amazon asin=B009S7O084&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Suzanne Barston, author of Bottled Up.

Topic: How the way we feed babies has come to define motherhood–and why it shouldn’t.

Issues: Breastfeeding rates are steadily rising in the US, but by three months after the birth, 64% of women are either supplementing with formula or have ceased to breastfeed completely; giving support and guidance for parents who feed their babies formula.


[amazon asin=B001O2NEE2&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 2: Lynda Fassa, author of Green Babies, Sage Moms .

Topic: Raising an organic baby.

Issues: What to avoid during pregnancy and beyond; finding and using products that are not toxic to mom and/or baby, including foods, pesticides, cleaning products, toys, nail polish, and even hair dryers.


[amazon asin=1600940161&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 3: Cheryl Fraker, author of Food Chaining.

Topic: The kid-tested solution for stress-free mealtimes.

Issues: The difference between normal, pick, and problem eaters; How to help your child enjoy new and nutritious foods—no matter how picky an eater he is; preventing food aversions before they develop; what parents can do at home to deal with eating, and what they’ll need professional help with.

A healthier, longer life: maybe the best argument for sending the kids to college

There’s been a lot written about how people with college degrees outearn those with only a high-school diploma, and how high-school grads outearn those who didn’t finish school. But did you know that educated Americans are less likely to be obese and suffer from chronic illnesses than those who have less education? The evidence is pretty darn compelling–compelling enough to get me to stop complaining quite so much about how much my kids’ college tuition is.

The study, produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analyzed the role that socioeconomic status plays in our health. Here are a few fascinating highlights:

  • In 2006, the average 25-year-old man without a high school diploma had a life expectancy 9.3 years less than men with a Bachelor’s degree or higher. Women without a high school diploma had a life expectancy 8.6 years less than those with a Bachelor’s degree or higher.

Your Husband and Breastfeeding

I’m breastfeeding our baby and I know my husband is 100 percent supportive. But sometimes I can tell that he’s feeling a little left out. Is there anything I can do to help him? How can he be involved in raising our child when so much of it depends on me and breastfeeding?

You know all about how great breastfeeding is, right? That it’s free, that it never runs out, and that breastfed babies’ diapers don’t stink are major advantages. But there’s a lot more. It gives you and your child a great opportunity to bond. It’s also the perfect blend of nutrients for the baby. Breastfed kids have a much lower chance than formula-fed kids of developing food allergies, respiratory- and gastrointestinal illnesses, or of becoming obese as adults. It may also transmit your immunity to certain diseases on to the baby. Pretty much everyone agrees that you should breastfeed for at least a year if you can.
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The hidden costs of breastfeeding

WASHINGTON, DC, April 26, 2012 — Pediatricians and other breastfeeding advocates often encourage
new mothers to breastfeed their babies for at least the first six months of their infants’ lives based on the purported health benefits to both mothers and children. Many breastfeeding proponents also argue that
breastfeeding has financial advantages over formula-feeding—breastfeeding is free, they say. But,
according to a new study, the notion that there’s no cost associated with breastfeeding for the
recommended amount of time is patently untrue.
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