Helping Struggling Students + Say This, Not That


Barbara Dianis, author of Don’t Count Me Out!
Topic:
Better grades and test scores for kids with educational difficulties.
Issues: Building strong bonds between academically struggling students and parents as they learn to understand and alleviate educational issues.

 


Carl Alasko, author of Say This, Not That.
Topic:
How to always say the right thing at the right time.
Issues: The five rules of effective communication; what to say–and not say–in stressful situations; exploring the biology behind communication; how to avoid spilling emotional blood.

Yet Another Reason Breastfeeding is Best

breastfeeding is best

Most of us know that breastfeeding has all sorts of great health benefits for kids, including better immune system function, fewer allergies, and lowered risk of obesity, tooth decay, pneumonia, and ear infections. New research from Tel Aviv University has added one more benefit: protection against ADHD in the teen years.
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Prescription Drug Abuse: You May Be Your Kid’s Pusher

prescription drug abuse

You’ve talked to your kids about drugs and alcohol, right? Cocaine, marijuana, maybe heroin, mushrooms, and crack. But what about prescrtion drug abuse? What about all that stuff in your medicine cabinet? About 80 percent of teenagers say that they’ve talked with their parents about alcohol and marijuana use, and about one in three said they’d they’d discussed cocaine and crack. But only 14-16 percent say that prescription drug abuse (including painkillers) ever came up.

It’s no big surprise, then, that nearly 25 percent of American teenagers—that’s more than 5 million kids—say they’ve abused prescription medications. That’s up 33 percent in just the past five years. Here are some of the sobering statistics from a poll of 3,900 9th-12th graders and 800 parents conducted by The Partnership at drugfree.org and the MetLife Foundation:
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The Ethics—and Dangers—of Prescribing ADHD Meds to Kids Who Don’t Need Them

adhd meds for kids who don't need them is a bad idea

adhd meds for kids who don't need them is a bad ideaIt’s pretty widely accepted these days that too many young children—especially boys—are being diagnosed with ADHD. And it’s just as widely accepted that too many of those children are taking too much medication. Still, for the kids who truly need the medication, there are tremendous benefits. But ADHD meds are stimulants and they’re now being taken by kids who don’t have ADHD but who think taking the drugs will improve their concentration and, consequently, their GPA.

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Young Kids More Likely to Be Diagnosed with ADHD–and Medicated

There’s been a lot of talk lately about how young children—especially boys—are being overdiagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and overmedicated.

A new study in the journal Pediatrics adds another wrinkle. Not all kids are equally likely to be diagnosed and medicated. In fact, those in the youngest third of their class are 50 percent more likely to be prescribed a drug for ADHD than the older kids in the class.

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Snoring kids have more behavior problems

Does your child snore, breathe through her mouth, or seem to step breathing for a few seconds at a time? If so, there’s a pretty good chance that you’re going to be seeing some behavioral or emotional problems (like ADD, ADHD, and anxiety) pretty soon.

In the largest study of its kind, doctors tracked 13,000 kids from infancy through age seven. 45 percent of the kids had no breathing problems. The other 55 percent did, including 8 percent who were in the “worst case” group (meaning their breathing issues peaked between ages 2 and 3 and then persisted.

Of the kids who had some kind of breathing problems, about 8 percent developed behavioral problems. But for the ones who did have some breathing issues, 13.5 percent had behavior problems. The “worst case” kids had a whopping 72 percent chance of developing behavioral and/or emotional symptoms by age seven.

The study was published in the journal Pediatrics. An article about the study is here:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/06/us-snoring-tied-kids-idUSTRE8251KG20120306