Food Allergies and Intolerance + Food Addiction + Potty Training + Food Fights

Guest 1: Alexandra Anca, author of The Food Allergy Health and Diet Guide .
Topic: Managing food allergies and intolerances by eliminating common allergens and gluten.
Issues: Identifying the most common allergens; finding out for sure whether you have an allergy/intolerance; strategies for living with food allergies; preparing healthy, delicious allergen-free meals.


Guest 2: David Kessler, author of Your Food is Fooling You.<
Topic: How your brain is hijacked by sugar, fat, and salt.
Issues: Why we overeat; why it’s so hard to stop; how we can break the cycle once and for all; additional pressured by teens; helping teens stay away from potentially lifelong bad habits.


Guest 3: Preston Smith, author of The Potty Trainer.
Topic: The ultimate guide to potty training your child.
Issues: When to start potty training; how to do it; the importance of parents staying engaged in the process; the increasing number of post-potty-training issues such as bedwetting, daytime accidents, etc; when a toilet-related issue warrants a trip to the pediatrician.


Guest 4: Laura Jana, author of Food Fights .
Topic: Winning the nutritional challenges of parenthood armed with insight, humor, and a bottle of ketchup.
Issues: How to pick your battles and arm yourself accordingly; tv dinners, fast foods and other nutritional minefields; the 5-second rule; influences of family, friends, and others.

Pills Are Not for Preschoolers + Young Adults in Recovery

www.amazon.co.ukGuest 1: Marilyn Wedge, author of Pills Are Not for Preschoolers.
Topic: A drug-free approach for troubled kids.
Issues: Understanding that there are almost always alternative treatments methods other than medication for troubled kids; the need to change the language mental health professionals use to classify behaviors and feelings.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 2: Joseph Lee, author of Recovering My Kid.
Topic: Parenting young adults in treatment and beyond.
Issues: What is addiction? How do we cope when a child returns home from treatment? How can parents support his or her recovery? How can the family be supportive during the recovery process? What if the child relapses?

Alternatives to ADD Meds + Young Adults in Rehab + Bilingual Advantage + Sending Kids to College

www.amazon.co.ukGuest 1: Marilyn Wedge, author of Pills Are Not for Preschoolers.
Topic: A drug-free approach for troubled kids.
Issues: Understanding that there are almost always alternative treatments methods other than medication for troubled kids; the need to change the language mental health professionals use to classify behaviors and feelings.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 2: Joseph Lee, author of Recovering My Kid.
Topic: Parenting young adults in treatment and beyond.
Issues: What is addiction? How do we cope when a child returns home from treatment? How can parents support his or her recovery? How can the family be supportive during the recovery process? What if the child relapses?


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 3: Barbara Zurer Pearson, author of Raising a Bilingual Child.
Topic: A step by step guide for parents.
Issues: The tremendous advantages bilinguals have in the business world; the advantages of a bilingual upbringing and how it can enhance a child’s intellectual development; how children learn language and how it differs from the way adults learn.


www.amazon.co.ukGuest 4: Marie Pinak Carr, author of Prepared Parent’s Operational Manual.Topic: What parents need to know before sending a child off to college.
Issues: Getting your child (and yourself) prepared to cope with finances and budgeting, insurance issues, homesickness, long-distance physical illness, roommate troubles; what to do—and how to protect yourself—when the unexpected happens.

Knowing What To Do in Families Affected by Addiction

I’ve been incredibly luck to have never had an addiction (except maybe to exercise, which, if you have to be addicted to something, is pretty tolerable). But I’ve seen how it can tear families apart. In this powerful guest post, Jillian Thompson offers some solid insights and sage advice. Whether there is addiction in your family or you know someone who’s an addict, read this.

Addicts’ relationships with their family can be either their salvation or their damnation when it comes to dealing with their condition. Many addicts consider deep-seeded family issues to be the cause of their affliction in the first place, whether it be from neglect at a young age or chronic abuse while growing up. Others shut themselves off from their family while in the throes of their addiction, possibly either seeking to shelter loved ones from the reality of their situation or keeping those who would get in their way of securing a high from finding out about it at all. Whatever the case may be, a healthy relationship with one’s family could provide a strong foundation in seeking treatment for addiction. However, for those seeking help with their condition, a healthy relationship with the family may not be easy to come by for either side involved, due to the family’s past exposure to the addict’s condition.

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This week on Talking About Men’s Health

Lots of informative, educational, and all-around excellent articles on men’s health this week

I wrote articles on birth control for men, the increased stroke risk in men whose parents divorced, and how antioxidants can improve men’s fertility .

We’ve also got posts by a lot of great contributors on the importance of wearing sunglasses, deciding on whether HGH is right for you, the body’s role in addiction, making informed decisions about surgery vs radiation for prostate cancer, and what insisting that boys sit quietly at their desks is a terrible idea.

Check out all these and more at Talking About Men’s Health.

And if you’re interested in contributing to the blog, let me know!

Navigating the Dating Waters after Rehab: How to Handle the Stress of Finding Love

Under the best of circumstances, dating can be pretty stressful. But what happens if you’ve suffered from addiction and/or been in rehab? How do you get back in the game? In today’s guest post, Terry Stegall has some great advice.

You’ve left rehab feeling a new found sense of optimism; you’re wondering if the time is right to share your new sober life with a significant other. The dating world is treacherous and gut-wrenchingly terrifying enough without attempting to remain clean. Dealing with all the emotional highs and lows of makeups, break-ups and the dreaded singles scene is stressful enough as is.

Before jumping feet first and blindfolded in shark-infested waters, take a step back, examine your life and take a thorough look, before allowing someone to share your present and future. You may think you’re ready, but it’s important to realize that beginning a new (and potentially tumultuous) relationship, could prove detrimental to your sobriety.

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