A Dozen Ways to Healthy Sperm

I know its hard to fathom but spring is almost here. Out East, they’re buried in snow. Out West, the specials this week are flooding and mudslides. Nevertheless, soon enough, birds and bees will fill the air and thoughts of more than just pollination will cross the minds of many.

So, how do you make your sperm as healthy and fit as they can be? Well, the body makes sperm, so anything that effects overall health can affect sperm. [Read more...]

Winter Ain’t Over, and Neither is S.A.D

If you’re feeling some of those winter blues, check out this helpful infographic on S.A.D. (Seasonal Affective Dissorder).

seasonal affective disorder s.a.d.

5 Things You Should Know About Stretching and Mobility

One of the greatest debates in athletic history has to be the whether or not stretching is beneficial. I remember when I was in school the latestand greatest technique was bouncing into the stretch, it was part of – not before the warm up and feeling the burn was a good thing. The more the better.

So what are the leaders in the field now saying about stretching? Let’s take a deeper look into it and find out 5 essential things you should know about stretching and mobility. [Read more...]

Your Health Guide For Staying Well While Traveling Abroad

stay healthy while traveling

Dodging polio or malaria while overseas starts with prevention. The following is a preventative guide for staying healthy while traveling abroad and tips on what to do if you get sick in a foreign country.

Trip Prep Basics

  • Learn what you’re up against. Crossing an ocean to a foreign land can expose your health to vulnerabilities and risk for infection. Learn about your destination by accessing the Consular Information Program’s Country Specific Information by the State Department’s Office of American Citizens Services and Crisis Management (ACS). Click on the map to see the health and medical considerations of your destination country.
  • Get vaccinations and immunizations. Catching measles, mumps or rubella can seriously wreck your trip. Get the appropriate shots to prevent diseases such as the food and water-borne hepatitis A. Make sure your vaccination records are up-to-date and visit Travelers’ Health by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to learn more about travel-related diseases and essential country-specific vaccines and medicines. The World Health Organization also provides a health profile for WHO countries.
  • Visit your doctor or a travel health expert at a specialized travel medicine clinic. After researching your destination country, talk to a specialist about your current health status, individual risk factors and mandatory or recommended vaccines. You’ll also need an International Certificate of Vaccination, also known as Yellow Card.
  • Check your health insurance policy and available medical services. Imagine paying around $10,000 for a medical evacuation. You’ll want to prepare for an unexpected illness or accident with short-term travel medical insurance. Ask what type of medical services are available during an emergency while dealing with a foreign medical system. The U.S. Passports & International Travel and Bureau of Consular Affairs site offers a list of U.S.-based travel insurance companies for overseas travelers. The CDC also details everything you need to know about travel health insurance and medical evaluation insurance.
  • Prepare prescription medications. Ask your physician for proper medical documentation or records and carry medications in your carry-on bag in their originally prescribed containers. Make sure to bring emergency refills, extra doses and the contact information of your doctor and pharmacist.

If You Get Sick While Abroad

  • Use your tablet for research. For instance, diarrhea is a common health problem, and 30 to 70 percent of travelers experience it in the high-risk regions of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and South America. Before you seek medical attention for a non-emergency health problem, look into MeMD online for a diagnosis of common medical ailments and treatments like diarrhea, allergies, earache, fever, and nausea. If your problem persists or worsens, consult professional medical help.
  • Visit a pharmacy for a diagnosis of run-of-the-mill conditions and remedies. European travel expert Rick Steves also recommends that European travelers go to a hospital for life-threatening emergencies and clinics for non-emergency health problems. If you’re charged a fee, you may have to pay out of pocket, despite having medical insurance. Return home with a copy of the bill to file a claim for reimbursement, and contact your travel insurance as soon as possible to report the injury.
  • Contact the US embassy. Register with the US embassy in your destination country by creating an account with the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Consular officers can help provide medical assistance and even aid in funds transfers. Medical care resources recommended by the CDC also include the International Association for Medical Assistance to Travelers (you’ll need a membership) and the Joint Commission International.

What Men Should Know & Do About the Flu

Spring is on the horizon, and you may be thinking that flu season is a thing of the past. But, the truth is flu viruses can circulate as late as May. As of February 21, CDC data shows flu activity remains elevated nationally but is decreasing. Young and middle-aged adults, including those with chronic conditions and those who are otherwise healthy, have been among the hardest hit by flu this season. However, there is good news to share about the flu vaccine this season – it is providing solid protection to people of all ages. In fact, new information released on February 20 finds that the flu vaccine reduced a vaccinated person’s risk of having to go to the doctor for flu illness by about 61% across all ages. CDC recommends that everyone age 6 months and older receive an annual flu vaccination. If you haven’t been vaccinated yet this flu season, CDC urges you to do so now.

[Read more...]

Cleanse Diets: Are They Worth It?

Around the new year, people are determined to get in shape and be healthier in general. This usually includes going to the gym more often, limiting your late night trips to the golden arches, and dieting. With so many people facing similar goals and challenges, diets have become almost an annual fad that we see in the early months of every year. In recent years, we’ve seen the Atkins diet, the South Beach diet, and so on. One of the most recent diets that society seems to have taken a liking to is the “Master Cleanse” diet. [Read more...]

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