4 Macho and Manly Minivans: They Really Do Exist

manly minivans

manly minivans

Over the years, minivans have gotten a bit of a bad rap for their somewhat bland functionality and lack of automotive zest. However, in many ways this assessment is simply not fair. As many minivan drivers know quite well, they are comfortable, roomy and economical ways to cart your family, friends, pets and needed paraphernalia around.

While many moms are more than happy to drive their minivans around the neighborhood, some dads are still a bit reluctant to hop behind the wheel. But as Bankrate notes, there are some minivans that even the most macho and manly dad can appreciate and enjoy driving. For example, consider the following:

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When Should Bedwetting Stop?

Dear Mr. Dad: My 7-year old still wets his bed. He’s terribly embarrassed about it and doesn’t want to have sleepovers with friends—at our house or theirs. He seems really stressed about it, and the problem is getting worse with time. How common is it for a 7-year old to be wetting his bed at night? What could be causing it—is it something we’ve done or is he doing it to send us a message? And how can we help him to stay dry?

A: Let’s start with the easy stuff: Nighttime bedwetting is a lot more common than most people think. According to Steve Hodges, co-author of “It’s No Accident,” 20% of five year olds, 10% of 6-year olds, 7% of 8-year olds, and 5% of kids over 10 have occasional or frequent accidents at night.

Before we get into the causes and cures, it’s important to understand that bedwetting is rarely anyone’s fault, and it’s really unlikely that your son is doing it to get back at you. However, you could be making it worse if you’re shaming or punishing your son (more on that below). He already feels plenty of shame, and the toll it’s taking on his self-esteem could be what’s making the problem worse.
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Preventing Sports-Related Head Injuries

According to the University of Rochester Medical Center, 30 million children and teens participate in some type of organized sport or recreational activity, and each year there are more than 3.5 million injuries from sports participation. Almost a third of childhood injuries are sports-related, with sprains, strains, and traumatic brain injuries (most commonly called concussions) being the most common. In September 2013, CBS News reported that sports-related head injuries had increased by more than 90 percent since 2001.
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A Personal History of ADHD


Timothy Denevi, author of Hyper.
Topic:
A personal history of ADHD.
Issues: What it’s like to be a boy who can’t stop screaming or fighting or fidgeting; startling stats about ADHD (1/5 of high-school-age boys and 11 percent of all school-age children have been diagnosed with ADHD; the evolution of drug treatments; understanding this complex and controversial diagnosis.

The Learning Habit + Hyper


Rebecca Jackson, co-author of The Learning Habit.
Topic:
A groundbreaking approach to homework that helps kids succeed in school and life.
Issues: Recent research on learning—what works and what doesn’t; managing our kids’ media use; supporting academic homework and reading; mastering time management; communicating effectively; learning to focus; developing self-reliance.



Timothy Denevi, author of Hyper.
Topic:
A personal history of ADHD.
Issues: What it’s like to be a boy who can’t stop screaming or fighting or fidgeting; startling stats about ADHD (1/5 of high-school-age boys and 11 percent of all school-age children have been diagnosed with ADHD; the evolution of drug treatments; understanding this complex and controversial diagnosis.

When Nutrition Guidelines Backfire

Dear Mr. Dad. A few weeks ago you wrote that parents shouldn’t try to force kids to eat their vegetables because it could backfire. I see the logic in having only healthy foods around the house and letting the kids decide how much they want to eat. But what are we supposed to do when they’re at school? Is there some way to get cafeterias and snack bars to serve only healthy foods?

A: Great—and very tough—question. Yes, it’s possible to get schools to serve healthy foods. This past summer, I read a great article about lunches at one school in France, where all the food is locally sourced and prepared (including freshly baked bread every day), the menus are reviewed by a certified dietician, and the only beverage is water. Unfortunately, attempts to nudge American schools in that direction have been both heavy-handed and unsuccessful.
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