Redefine Your Retirement With These Unique Hobbies

Today’s seniors are embracing their retirement like never before – with gusto and imagination. If you’re retired, or nearing retirement, redefine your retirement by focusing on activities that bring out your unique inner qualities. The following is a list of post-retirement hobbies that will have you experiencing life like never before…

TRAVEL
Whether you’re visiting distant relatives or planning a trip to Europe, it’s how you get there that supersizes your retirement. Anyone can purchase plane tickets or go on a cruise, but the truly unique find alternative routes.

Imagine touching down in your childhood home at the helm of your own small airplane. It’s not difficult to garner a pilot’s license, and you’ll have all the years of your retirement to fly anywhere you like. Plus, you’ll look chic sporting a pair of aviators and an aviation headset, among the other pilot supplies you’ll need to get you where you’re going.

If soaring through the clouds isn’t your thing, there’s still plenty of interesting travel opportunities on the ground. For domestic travel, a motor home is an excellent way to see the country and still wake up in your own bed. Alternatively, you could fly or sail to a foreign nation and experience backpacking, camping, and more.

CREATE
“I’m finally going to create my masterpiece,” said nearly every retired person ever…But, how many of them actually moved forward and completed their novels, paintings, or productions? Don’t get caught up in saying you’ll do something. Retirement is a time to actually create something; assuming that creation is your thing.

If you’re a writer, why not start a blog? You can’t write a novel in a single day, but you can create a blog in less than an hour. If you’d like to begin painting, but don’t know where to start, there are classes and YouTube instructional videos for every class of artist. Go there, and Do. Other creative pursuits include:

  • Interior design
  • Landscaping
  • Sculpting
  • Woodworking
  • Restoring vintage cars, boats and planes

MOVE
In order to live the fullest life, you’re going to want to stay healthy. Diet and exercise are crucial during this stage of life, but diet and exercise can be monotonous. In order to keep your retirement fun, don’t spend your early mornings walking around the mall.

Instead, learn a new sport, and then join a sports or fitness team. Swim with sharks! Go scuba diving! Kitesurf! Fitness can be fun, and it doesn’t have to be stressful. If you’re looking to get moving closer to home, why not try geocashing? It’s fun, local, and a great way to connect with your inner explorer.

SOCIALIZE
There’s this stigma that retired people are unexciting, and often lead slow, lonely lives. Grandma has her knitting needles, and grandpa has baseball on the television – the kids sometimes visit on the weekends…These are the stigmas of old. This biggest myth of retirement is that it’s lonely and boring. Though depression is a reality for all age groups, retirement can be just as exciting as college–seriously. You can socialize, and it doesn’t have to be over a game of shuffleboard on a cruise for seniors (although that does sound interesting).

In your supercharged retirement, you can socialize in new and exciting ways. If you miss the popularity of your formative years, go ahead and throw an epic house party. If that sounds a bit too loud for your tastes, why not take a cooking class, try speed dating, download Tinder, or put yourself out there in a way you always dreamed, such as joining a performing arts troupe?

Live the life you dream, and be as adventurous, socially and otherwise, as you want!

Get Active: 6 Outdoor Family Friendly Adventures

mrdad - family activities

mrdad  - family activities

Summer vacation is the perfect time to round up all the kids, turn off the TVs and computers and get moving outside. According to a study by AAA, more than 66 percent of Americans were planning to take a leisurely trip between Memorial Day and Labor Day, with family being one of the top priorities for their travel plans. Mix it up this year and embrace your sense of adventure. Here are some ideas for family adventure trips that will keep your kids’ adrenaline racing long after you get home.

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Technology Will Never Replace Dad’s Love

Came across this wonderful video from Thailand. Get ready to do a little tear-wiping.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10152487010134020

Reducing Medication Dosing Errors By Ditching Teaspoons and Tablespoos

Busy, multitasking parents are at risk for making medication mistakes, as they may not remember their child’s prescribed dose or may not know how to measure the dose correctly. According to a study in the August 2014 Pediatrics, “Unit of Measurement Used and Parent Medication Dosing Errors,” published online July 14, medication errors are common. The study found that 39.4 percent of parents incorrectly measured the dose they intended, and ultimately 41.1 percent made an error in measuring what their doctor had prescribed. Part of the reason why parents may be confused regarding how to dose prescribed medications accurately is that a range of units of measurement, like milliliters, teaspoons and tablespoons, may be used interchangeably to describe their child’s dose as part of counseling by their doctor or pharmacist, or when the dose is shown on their prescription or medication bottle label. Due to concerns about these issues, use of the milliliter as the single standard unit of measurement for pediatric liquid medications has been suggested as a strategy to reduce medication errors by organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. In this study, compared to parents who used milliliter-only units, parents who used teaspoon or tablespoon units to describe their child’s dose of liquid medicine had twice the odds of making a mistake in measuring the intended dose. Parents who described their dose using teaspoons or tablespoons were more likely to use a kitchen spoon to dose, rather than a standardized instrument like an oral syringe, dropper, or cup. Even those who used standardized instruments were still more likely to make a dosing error if they reported their child’s dose using teaspoon or tablespoon units. Parent mix up of terms like milliliter, teaspoon and tablespoon contribute to more than 10,000 poison center calls each year. Study authors conclude that adopting a milliliter-only unit of measurement can reduce confusion and decrease medication errors, especially for parents with low health literacy or limited English proficiency.

Bed-Sharing Remains Greatest Risk Factor For Sleep-Related Infant Deaths

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related causes of infant mortality have several known risk factors, but little is known if these factors change for different age groups. In a new study in the August 2014 Pediatrics, “Sleep Environment Risks for Younger and Older Infants,” published online July 14, researchers studied sleep-related infant deaths from 24 states from 2004-2012 in the case reporting system of the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths. Cases were divided by younger (0-3 months) and older (4 months to one year) infants. In a total of 8,207 deaths analyzed, majority of the infants (69 percent) were bed-sharing at the time of death. Fifty-eight percent were male, and most deaths occurred in non-Hispanic whites. Younger infants were more likely bed-sharing (73.8 percent vs. 58.9 percent), sleeping on an adult bed or on/near a person, while older infants were more likely found prone with objects, such as blankets or stuffed animals in the sleep area. Researchers conclude that sleep-related infant deaths risk factors are different for younger and older infants. Parents should follow the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations for a safe sleep environment and understand that different factors reflect risk at different developmental stages.

Kids Who Can ID Fast-Food Logos are More Likely to Be Overweight

It isn’t supposed to be this way, but parenthood can be a competitive sport. Whose kid scored the most points? Whose got the best grades? Whose started speaking or walking or crawling earliest? Whose got a modeling contract? Whose can identify the most brand logos? Most of the time, when our child excels, we’re proud—as though somehow his or her accomplishments are a reflection of our amazing parenting skills.

But when it comes to brand logos, we may want to be a little more humble—and discouraging—especially if those logos have anything to do with fast foods. According to researchers at Michigan State University, the more fast-food logos a child could identify, the greater his or her BMI (a measure of body fat based on a ratio between height and weight).
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