Prenatal group sessions may mean less weight gain | Futurity

Prenatal group sessions may mean less weight gain | Futurity.

Men’s Health Network supports screening for lung cancer, recommends e-cigarettes to curb smoking

Men’s Health Network supports screening for lung cancer, recommends e-cigarettes to curb smoking.

Dealing with very early overweight and obesity important in stemming the obesity epidemic

Dealing with very early overweight and obesity important in stemming the obesity epidemic | American Council on Science and Health (ACSH).

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. And Breakfast. And Lunch.

Dear Mr. Dad: I have a 20-year-old son who has been living on his own for several years. But he’s hit a few rough patches lately, and now wants to move back home. My wife and I want to do the right thing and help him, but we’re afraid that letting him move back in with us could turn out to be the wrong thing in the end—for everyone. Is it wrong of us to want our son to stay on his own?

A: Well, first of all, congratulations. You raised your son right: he went to school, got a job, and started making a life for himself. So it’s only natural that you’d assumed that you and your wife would have your house to yourselves. But times are much, much different than when you were your son’s age. According to a recent survey by Payscale.com, only 4 percent of Baby Boomers were living at home after having started their careers. Eleven percent of Gen X (those born between 1961 and 1981) got their first jobs but kept living (or moved back in with) ma and pa. And 28 percent of Gen Y (those born after 1982) are still under their parents’ roof. It’s no wonder that your son’s generation is sometimes called the Boomerang Generation.
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Kindergarten is the new first grade, for better or worse

Kindergarten is the new first grade, for better or worse | Futurity.