Myth of the Spoiled Child

Alfie Kohn, author of The Myth of the Spoiled Child
Topic:
Challenging the conventional wisdom about children and parenting
Issues: Parents are accused of being permissive and overprotective, unwilling to set limits and afraid to let their kids fail. At the same time, young people are described as entitled and narcissistic. But there is no scientific evidence at all to support these claims.

Kids, Tablets, Phones and Staying Safe Online

I don’t know about you but whenever I see a little kid playing with a tablet, I flash back to the beginning of Orson Scott Card’s Enders Game and think, “how did he know?!” It’s amazing how quickly tablets (and, to a lesser degree, smartphones) have gone from things we were pretty sure we didn’t want our kids using at young ages to things that are now almost common school supplies.

Seriously: some schools actually supply tablets to their students. Even when those kids are still in elementary school. I don’t know about you, but my second grader has a hard time remembering her lunchbox when she gets off the bus. I’m terrified over the idea of having to replace a lost tablet.
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Being a Happy Student + Are Teens Really Narcissistic


Paula Franzese, author of A Short & Happy Guide to Being a College Student
Topic:
How to be your best self in school, at work, and in life
Issues: 10 reasons to be happy about school; guideposts to live by; how to assure success and significance in school; finding your career path, applying for jobs, and handling rejection; handling conflict or adversity; how to succeed in a class that’s boring.



Alfie Kohn, author of The Myth of the Spoiled Child
Topic:
Challenging the conventional wisdom about children and parenting
Issues: Parents are accused of being permissive and overprotective, unwilling to set limits and afraid to let their kids fail. At the same time, young people are described as entitled and narcissistic. But there is no scientific evidence at all to support these claims.

Exploring the Culinary Arts

Dear Mr. Dad: I’m not a whiz in the kitchen but I learned enough as a kid to make it through college without having to subsist solely on peanut butter sandwiches and Ramen noodles. My wife and I both cook meals but we can’t seem to get our son (age 11) remotely interested in cooking. How do we get him interested in learning how to cook for himself?

A: You’re absolutely right—everyone should be able to cook enough to feed themselves. Most of us will never become great chefs, but it is possible to get your son to join you in the “not-a-whiz-in-the-kitchen” category. At the very least, knowing how to cook a few things will improve your son’s diet–kids who can cook are less likely to rely on fast food and more likely to eat healthier foods. There are a number of other advantages, which I’ll get to in a minute. But your first step should be to try to figure out what your son has against getting in front of the stove.
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The Amazing Healing Power of Music

Jerome Preisler, author of Daniel’s Music
Topic:
One family’s journey from tragedy to empowerment through faith, medicine, and the healing power of music
Issues: An amazing story of survival against the odds; how Daniel Trush suffered multiple aneurisms, was in a coma for more than a month, endured multiple strokes, and was given slim to no chance of survival. But just a decade later, he completed the NY City marathon.