Redefine Your Retirement With These Unique Hobbies

Today’s seniors are embracing their retirement like never before – with gusto and imagination. If you’re retired, or nearing retirement, redefine your retirement by focusing on activities that bring out your unique inner qualities. The following is a list of post-retirement hobbies that will have you experiencing life like never before…

TRAVEL
Whether you’re visiting distant relatives or planning a trip to Europe, it’s how you get there that supersizes your retirement. Anyone can purchase plane tickets or go on a cruise, but the truly unique find alternative routes.

Imagine touching down in your childhood home at the helm of your own small airplane. It’s not difficult to garner a pilot’s license, and you’ll have all the years of your retirement to fly anywhere you like. Plus, you’ll look chic sporting a pair of aviators and an aviation headset, among the other pilot supplies you’ll need to get you where you’re going.

If soaring through the clouds isn’t your thing, there’s still plenty of interesting travel opportunities on the ground. For domestic travel, a motor home is an excellent way to see the country and still wake up in your own bed. Alternatively, you could fly or sail to a foreign nation and experience backpacking, camping, and more.

CREATE
“I’m finally going to create my masterpiece,” said nearly every retired person ever…But, how many of them actually moved forward and completed their novels, paintings, or productions? Don’t get caught up in saying you’ll do something. Retirement is a time to actually create something; assuming that creation is your thing.

If you’re a writer, why not start a blog? You can’t write a novel in a single day, but you can create a blog in less than an hour. If you’d like to begin painting, but don’t know where to start, there are classes and YouTube instructional videos for every class of artist. Go there, and Do. Other creative pursuits include:

  • Interior design
  • Landscaping
  • Sculpting
  • Woodworking
  • Restoring vintage cars, boats and planes

MOVE
In order to live the fullest life, you’re going to want to stay healthy. Diet and exercise are crucial during this stage of life, but diet and exercise can be monotonous. In order to keep your retirement fun, don’t spend your early mornings walking around the mall.

Instead, learn a new sport, and then join a sports or fitness team. Swim with sharks! Go scuba diving! Kitesurf! Fitness can be fun, and it doesn’t have to be stressful. If you’re looking to get moving closer to home, why not try geocashing? It’s fun, local, and a great way to connect with your inner explorer.

SOCIALIZE
There’s this stigma that retired people are unexciting, and often lead slow, lonely lives. Grandma has her knitting needles, and grandpa has baseball on the television – the kids sometimes visit on the weekends…These are the stigmas of old. This biggest myth of retirement is that it’s lonely and boring. Though depression is a reality for all age groups, retirement can be just as exciting as college–seriously. You can socialize, and it doesn’t have to be over a game of shuffleboard on a cruise for seniors (although that does sound interesting).

In your supercharged retirement, you can socialize in new and exciting ways. If you miss the popularity of your formative years, go ahead and throw an epic house party. If that sounds a bit too loud for your tastes, why not take a cooking class, try speed dating, download Tinder, or put yourself out there in a way you always dreamed, such as joining a performing arts troupe?

Live the life you dream, and be as adventurous, socially and otherwise, as you want!

Will You Please Get a Room? Please?

Dear Mr. Dad: We have two boys, ages four and nine. The nine-year-old has no problem sleeping in his own bed, but the four-year-old constantly wants to sleep with my husband and me. I don’t mind an occasional “sleep over”–especially when my husband is away on business and the bed seems so empty. But lately, my son wants to be in our bed every night. That seems a little old to me. Is co-sleeping with a four-year-old okay?

A: I wish I could give you a definitive Yes or No, but the real answer is the completely unsatisfying “It depends.” There’s a lot of controversy out there about co-sleepng (or “the family bed” or “bed sharing” or whatever else you want to call it). Some authorities, such as the Children’s Health Network and the American Academy of Pediatrics say the practice is dangerous and they point to studies that show that the incidence of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome) is higher when babies share a bed with parents. Others say that sharing a bed is fine, and they point to the fact that something like 80 percent of the world’s families practice co-sleeping. Unfortunatley, neither of those answers applies to your situation: At four, your son is far too old for you to worry about SIDS. And, like it or not, about 80 percen of the world’s families live in much, much smaller spaces than we do in the U.S., and the option for famiy members to sleep in separate rooms isn’t even on their radar.
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Get Active: 6 Outdoor Family Friendly Adventures

mrdad - family activities

mrdad  - family activities

Summer vacation is the perfect time to round up all the kids, turn off the TVs and computers and get moving outside. According to a study by AAA, more than 66 percent of Americans were planning to take a leisurely trip between Memorial Day and Labor Day, with family being one of the top priorities for their travel plans. Mix it up this year and embrace your sense of adventure. Here are some ideas for family adventure trips that will keep your kids’ adrenaline racing long after you get home.

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Your Baby’s Sensory World and Moods


Megan Faure, author of The Babysense Secret .
Topic: Learning how to understand your baby’s moods.
Issues: Creating a baby-centric routine and struggle less to get your baby to sleep; understanding your baby’s sensory world and signals to avoid overstimulation, which leads to fussiness.

Understanding Baby’s Mood + Happy At-Home Moms + Avoiding Judgmental Parents


Megan Faure, author of The Babysense Secret .
Topic: Learning how to understand your baby’s moods.
Issues: Creating a baby-centric routine and struggle less to get your baby to sleep; understanding your baby’s sensory world and signals to avoid overstimulation, which leads to fussiness.


Rachel Compos-Duffy, author of Stay Home, Stay Happy.
Topic: Secrets to loving at-home motherhood.
Issues: Embracing the choice to stay home with confidence; taking care of yourself guilt-free; mentally and physically recharging every day, and more.


Deborah Copaken-Kogan, author of] Hell is Other Parents.
Topic: Tales of maternal combustion.
Issues: A collection of witty, smart, funny, poignant essays on dealing with intrusive and judgmental other parents, modern working parenthood, raising a family on inadequate income.