Sheryl is Wrong: Bossy’s Fine. Let’s Ban Double Standards Instead

ban lies

As the father of three daughters, I support Sheryl Sandberg’s message that girls can lead. But I don’t support her other messages: First, it’s okay to use half-truths, twisted data, inaccurate and outdated information, and outright lies to get what you want. Second, women and girls aren’t smart enough to make their own life choices. Third, you don’t need to work hard to achieve success—the world owes you something just because you’re female.

Here are just a few examples.
Sandberg wants “equality” in the workplace, and drags out the old canard that there’s a male/female pay gap—and that that gap is the result of discrimination against women. The truth? Yes, the total amount of money earned by men is greater than the total earned by women. But that is largely a function of the different choices men and women make. Men put in about 50% more hours at work than women and, more importantly, men dominate in fields where there is less flexibility, more danger, and higher salaries, while women dominate in fields that offer more flexibility and, unfortunately, less income.

So, Sheryl, how much workplace equality do you really want? Ninety-five percent of people who die on the job are men. And two thirds of the unemployed are men. Where’s the outrage, Sheryl? Do you really want equal representation for males and females?
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Exploring the Culinary Arts

Dear Mr. Dad: I’m not a whiz in the kitchen but I learned enough as a kid to make it through college without having to subsist solely on peanut butter sandwiches and Ramen noodles. My wife and I both cook meals but we can’t seem to get our son (age 11) remotely interested in cooking. How do we get him interested in learning how to cook for himself?

A: You’re absolutely right—everyone should be able to cook enough to feed themselves. Most of us will never become great chefs, but it is possible to get your son to join you in the “not-a-whiz-in-the-kitchen” category. At the very least, knowing how to cook a few things will improve your son’s diet–kids who can cook are less likely to rely on fast food and more likely to eat healthier foods. There are a number of other advantages, which I’ll get to in a minute. But your first step should be to try to figure out what your son has against getting in front of the stove.
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The Amazing Healing Power of Music

Jerome Preisler, author of Daniel’s Music
Topic:
One family’s journey from tragedy to empowerment through faith, medicine, and the healing power of music
Issues: An amazing story of survival against the odds; how Daniel Trush suffered multiple aneurisms, was in a coma for more than a month, endured multiple strokes, and was given slim to no chance of survival. But just a decade later, he completed the NY City marathon.

Hofsas House + Carmel Food Tours + Thinking Teacher + Daniel’s Music

carmel food tour

hofsas house hotelKeri Tice, from Hofsas House Hotel in Carmel by the Sea, California

carmel food tourStaci Giovino, owner of Carmel Food Tours


Oliver Quinlan, author of The Thinking Teacher
Topic:
How teaching educators to become better thinkers helps children become better thinkers too
Issues: Why the traditional teaching model of simply delivering a curriculum is completely inappropriate for the 21st Century; helping children become participants in the subject they’re learning rather than simply acquirers of information; how to develop yourself into a thinking teacher who will help nurture thinking children

Jerome Preisler, author of Daniel’s Music
Topic:
One family’s journey from tragedy to empowerment through faith, medicine, and the healing power of music
Issues: An amazing story of survival against the odds; how Daniel Trush suffered multiple aneurisms, was in a coma for more than a month, endured multiple strokes, and was given slim to no chance of survival. But just a decade later, he completed the NY City marathon.

When Tempers Flare

Dear Mr. Dad: My son is six, and he’s still having temper tantrums. Call me crazy, but I thought they would have petered out long ago. Most of the other parents we know say their kids stopped having tantrums when they were two or three. But my son is giving no indication that he’s going to relent anytime soon. What should we do? How long do we have to wait for him to stop?

A: Since you asked for it, I’ll tell you: You’re crazy. If you think you can just sit around and wait for your son to grow out of throwing tantrums, you’re going to be very, very disappointed and frustrated. In fact, given how long this has lasted, there’s a good chance that you and your spouse are the reason your son is still having tantrums in the first place. The only way to bring his reign of terror to an end is for you to step in and start doing something about it. Now.
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Bringing in Finn


Sara Connell, author of Bringing in Finn.
Topic:
An extraordinary surrogacy story.
Issues: One woman’s story of the tragedy and heartbreak of infertility and losing pregnancies, and the process of opening her heart and mind to the idea of her 60-year old mother carrying her child for her.

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