Parental responsibility? Apparently there isn’t an app for that either.

I guess it had to happen sooner or later. A group of parents who can’t seem to take responsibility for their own behavior is suing Apple, alleging that iPhone and iPad apps are too addictive. According to court documents, Apples games are: “Highly addictive, designed deliberately to be so, and tend to compel children playing them to purchase large quantities of game currency, amounting to as much as $100 per purchase or more.”

Excuse me? Highly addictive? Compel children to purchase? Who owns the iPhone or iPad? Actually, a better question is who’s paying the bill? I hate to sound harsh, but if you authorize your child to make charges to your iTunes account–which is the way the vast majority of apps and their associated charges get billed–you’re on your own. What ever happened to just saying, “No”?

This is all part of a growing trend where parents try to blame others for their own problems. The schools are supposed to teach our children to behave, McDonald’s is addictive, my three-year old snuck out of the house through the doggy door and ran away, and on and on. If you’ve got any favorite examples of this kind of thing, let me know. I’m thinking of doing a book on it.

Oh, come on. Like it or not, we’re responsible for what our kids do–at least for a while. If you don’t want your kids to rack up charges on your iTunes account, how ’bout not giving them the password? And how ’bout not letting them play with (or own) the devices in the first place?

Comments

  1. Great points, Armin. I loved your book, and enjoy visiting your site.

Whatcha think?

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